Bibliography

Martin (Martin Joseph)
McNamara
s. xx / s. xxi

91 publications between 1971 and 2019 indexed
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Works authored

McNamara, Martin, The Bible and the apocrypha in the early Irish church (A.D. 600–1200), Instrumenta patristica et mediaevalia 66, Turnhout: Brepols, 2015.  
abstract:
The twenty-one essays in this volume, published from 1971 onwards, together with the introductions and conclusion, treat of the Bible and apocryphal works in Ireland during the pre-Norman period, from A.D. 600 to 1200. The essays cover developments during the period from Professor Bernhard Bischoff’s seminal 1954 essay ("Wendepunkte"), on new evidence for Irish contributions in the field, down to the present day. After an initial survey of research during this period, attention is paid to the texts of the Latin Bible, in particular the Psalms and the Four Gospels, and to the Antiochene influence on Psalm interpretation, as well as to the rich corpus of Irish apocryphal writings, some of them very early (Transitus Mariae, so-called Infancy Narrative of Thomas, texts on the Magi and a related Infancy Narrative). Special attention is paid to the creative biblical interpretation of the Psalms in the early Irish Church A.D. 600-800, and also to what appears to be an early Irish (early eighth-century) commentary on the Apocalypse. It is hoped that these essays will contribute to a renewed examination of early Irish exegesis in this the sixtieth year of the publication of Dr Bischoff’s 1954 essay.
abstract:
The twenty-one essays in this volume, published from 1971 onwards, together with the introductions and conclusion, treat of the Bible and apocryphal works in Ireland during the pre-Norman period, from A.D. 600 to 1200. The essays cover developments during the period from Professor Bernhard Bischoff’s seminal 1954 essay ("Wendepunkte"), on new evidence for Irish contributions in the field, down to the present day. After an initial survey of research during this period, attention is paid to the texts of the Latin Bible, in particular the Psalms and the Four Gospels, and to the Antiochene influence on Psalm interpretation, as well as to the rich corpus of Irish apocryphal writings, some of them very early (Transitus Mariae, so-called Infancy Narrative of Thomas, texts on the Magi and a related Infancy Narrative). Special attention is paid to the creative biblical interpretation of the Psalms in the early Irish Church A.D. 600-800, and also to what appears to be an early Irish (early eighth-century) commentary on the Apocalypse. It is hoped that these essays will contribute to a renewed examination of early Irish exegesis in this the sixtieth year of the publication of Dr Bischoff’s 1954 essay.
McNamara, Martin, The Psalms in the early Irish Church, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Supplement Series 165, Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 2000.  
A collection of reprints of articles which were first published in the period 1973-1999.
A collection of reprints of articles which were first published in the period 1973-1999.
McNamara, Martin [ed.], Glossa in Psalmos. The Hiberno-Latin gloss on the Psalms of Codex Palatinus Latinus 68 (Psalms 39:11-151:7), Studi e testi 310, Vatican City: Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, 1986.

Works edited

McNamara, Martin (ed.), Apocalyptic and eschatological heritage: the Middle East and Celtic realms, Dublin and Portland: Four Courts Press, 2003.
Breatnach, Caoimhín, John Carey, Brian Ó Cuív, Pádraig Ó Fiannachta, Martin McNamara, Jean-Daniel Kaestli, and Diarmuid Ó Laoghaire (eds), Apocrypha Hiberniae, part I: Evangelia infantiae, 2 vols, vol. 1, Corpus Christianorum, Series Apocryphorum 13, Turnhout: Brepols, 2001.
Breatnach, Caoimhín, John Carey, Brian Ó Cuív, Pádraig Ó Fiannachta, Martin McNamara, Jean-Daniel Kaestli, and Diarmuid Ó Laoghaire (eds), Apocrypha Hiberniae, part I: Evangelia infantiae, 2 vols, vol. 2, Corpus Christianorum, Series Apocryphorum 14, Turnhout: Brepols, 2001.
McNamara, Martin, Caoimhín Breatnach, John Carey, Jean-Daniel Kaestli, Brian Ó Cuív, Pádraig Ó Fiannachta, and Diarmuid Ó Laoghaire (eds), Apocrypha Hiberniae, part I: Evangelia infantiae, 2 vols, Corpus Christianorum, Series Apocryphorum 13–14, Turnhout: Brepols, 2001. xvi + iv + 1203 pp.  
abstract:

In 1927 M. R. James published Latin Infancy Gospels, identified by him in two related but not identical manuscripts (one the British Library Arundel 404; the other from Hereford), together with a parallel text from the Irish manuscript known as the Leabhar Breac. Later researches brought to light more manuscripts of this Latin work, and also of the Irish text. James recognized that his apocryphal Latin Infancy text was compiled from a combination of the Protevangelium of James and a hitherto unknown text which he named "The Source". Recent research has identified a full Latin translation of the Protevangelium of James. A hitherto unrecognized Irish Infancy Narrative has also been identified in the Dublin manuscript known as the Liber Flavus Fergusiorum. A deep study of this related tradition was called for. This has been carried out over the past ten years by an Irish team in conjunction with Professor Daniel Kaestli and AELAC. The fruits of this labour are published in these two volumes.

Volume 13 has a general introduction with a historical sketch of New Testament apocrypha in Ireland and a history of research on the subject. This is followed by a comparison of the Infancy Narratives in the Leabhar Breac and the Liber Flavus Fergusiorum. There are special introductions to these Infancy texts, followed by critical editions of the Irish texts, accompanied by English translations and rich annotation. Next there is similar treatment of the Irish versified Narrative (from ca. 700) of the Childhood Deeds of Jesus (commonly known as the Infancy Narrative (or Gospel) of Thomas. There is then (in volume 14, but with continuous pagination) the edition and translation of an Irish thirteenth-century poem with elements from Infancy Narratives, and both Latin and Irish texts on the wonders at Christ's birth, accompanied by translations and notes. The edition of the Irish material is followed by a critical edition of the full Arundel and Hereford forms of the Infancy Narrative (here referred to as the "J Compilation"), together with a detailed study of all the questions relating to this work. The volume concludes with a critical edition (by Rita Beyers) of the Latin text of the Protevangelium of James, accompanied by a detailed study of the work.

The work contains a detailed study of the Latin translations of the Protevangelium of James and the transmission of this work in the West. The "J Compilation" (a combination of the Protevangelium and texts of Pseudo-Matthew) can be traced back in manuscript transmission to ca. 800, and must have originated some time earlier. Behind it stands an earlier "I ("I" for Irish) Compilation" without influence from Pseudo-Matthew, the form found in the Irish witnesses. It is argued that M. R. James's "Source" may be of Judaeo-Christian origin and may really be the Gospel of the Nazoreans. Among the indexes there is a list of all the Irish words found in the texts.

abstract:

In 1927 M. R. James published Latin Infancy Gospels, identified by him in two related but not identical manuscripts (one the British Library Arundel 404; the other from Hereford), together with a parallel text from the Irish manuscript known as the Leabhar Breac. Later researches brought to light more manuscripts of this Latin work, and also of the Irish text. James recognized that his apocryphal Latin Infancy text was compiled from a combination of the Protevangelium of James and a hitherto unknown text which he named "The Source". Recent research has identified a full Latin translation of the Protevangelium of James. A hitherto unrecognized Irish Infancy Narrative has also been identified in the Dublin manuscript known as the Liber Flavus Fergusiorum. A deep study of this related tradition was called for. This has been carried out over the past ten years by an Irish team in conjunction with Professor Daniel Kaestli and AELAC. The fruits of this labour are published in these two volumes.

Volume 13 has a general introduction with a historical sketch of New Testament apocrypha in Ireland and a history of research on the subject. This is followed by a comparison of the Infancy Narratives in the Leabhar Breac and the Liber Flavus Fergusiorum. There are special introductions to these Infancy texts, followed by critical editions of the Irish texts, accompanied by English translations and rich annotation. Next there is similar treatment of the Irish versified Narrative (from ca. 700) of the Childhood Deeds of Jesus (commonly known as the Infancy Narrative (or Gospel) of Thomas. There is then (in volume 14, but with continuous pagination) the edition and translation of an Irish thirteenth-century poem with elements from Infancy Narratives, and both Latin and Irish texts on the wonders at Christ's birth, accompanied by translations and notes. The edition of the Irish material is followed by a critical edition of the full Arundel and Hereford forms of the Infancy Narrative (here referred to as the "J Compilation"), together with a detailed study of all the questions relating to this work. The volume concludes with a critical edition (by Rita Beyers) of the Latin text of the Protevangelium of James, accompanied by a detailed study of the work.

The work contains a detailed study of the Latin translations of the Protevangelium of James and the transmission of this work in the West. The "J Compilation" (a combination of the Protevangelium and texts of Pseudo-Matthew) can be traced back in manuscript transmission to ca. 800, and must have originated some time earlier. Behind it stands an earlier "I ("I" for Irish) Compilation" without influence from Pseudo-Matthew, the form found in the Irish witnesses. It is argued that M. R. James's "Source" may be of Judaeo-Christian origin and may really be the Gospel of the Nazoreans. Among the indexes there is a list of all the Irish words found in the texts.

Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989.
McNamara, Martin [ed.], Biblical studies: the medieval Irish contribution, Proceedings of the Irish Biblical Association 1, Dublin: Dominican Publications, 1976.
McNamara, Martin [ed.], Mount Saint Joseph, Ennistymon, 1824-1974, Ennistymon, Co. Clare: Leinster Leader, 1974.

Contributions to journals

McNamara, Martin, “De initiis: Irish monastic learning 600–800 AD”, Eolas 6 (2013): 4–40.
McNamara, Martin, “End of an era in early Irish biblical exegesis: Caimin Psalter fragments (11th–12th century) and the Gospels of Máel Brigte (A.D. 1138)”, Proceedings of the Irish Biblical Association 34 (2011): 76–121.
McNamara, Martin, “Five Irish psalter texts”, Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy 109 C (2009): 37–104.  
abstract:
In 1973 the present writer published an essay on the psalms in the early Irish Church (from AD 600 to 1200). In this he reviewed the material available for a study of the subject and gave a more detailed examination of some of the texts. The present work intends to supplement the 1973 essay. It concentrates on three central topics:

(1) the full collation of a hitherto unstudied text, the fragments of an Irish Hebraicum Psalter in MS. Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale de France (BNF) fr. 2452 (tenth century), fols 75-84, which on analysis is revealed as an early representative of the typical Irish recension of the Hebraicum (AKI—the sigla for the psalter text of the three MSS Amiatinus, Florence, Biblioteca Mediceo-Laurenziana Amiatino I; Karlsruhe, Badische Landesbibliothek, Aug. perg. 38; Rouen, Bibliothèque municipale 24 [A. 41]);

(2) a more detailed examination of the Psalter of Cormac (thirteenth century);

and (3) of the so-called Psalter of Caimin (c. 1100).

With these, two comments on two other psalters are also given (that in the 'Reference Bible' and the Double Psalter of St-Ouen) while a preliminary section treats of texts having a bearing on the understanding of the psalter in Ireland (the Tituli psalmorum attributed to Bede; psalm prologues and biblical canticles and psalm prayers).
abstract:
In 1973 the present writer published an essay on the psalms in the early Irish Church (from AD 600 to 1200). In this he reviewed the material available for a study of the subject and gave a more detailed examination of some of the texts. The present work intends to supplement the 1973 essay. It concentrates on three central topics:

(1) the full collation of a hitherto unstudied text, the fragments of an Irish Hebraicum Psalter in MS. Paris, Bibliothèque Nationale de France (BNF) fr. 2452 (tenth century), fols 75-84, which on analysis is revealed as an early representative of the typical Irish recension of the Hebraicum (AKI—the sigla for the psalter text of the three MSS Amiatinus, Florence, Biblioteca Mediceo-Laurenziana Amiatino I; Karlsruhe, Badische Landesbibliothek, Aug. perg. 38; Rouen, Bibliothèque municipale 24 [A. 41]);

(2) a more detailed examination of the Psalter of Cormac (thirteenth century);

and (3) of the so-called Psalter of Caimin (c. 1100).

With these, two comments on two other psalters are also given (that in the 'Reference Bible' and the Double Psalter of St-Ouen) while a preliminary section treats of texts having a bearing on the understanding of the psalter in Ireland (the Tituli psalmorum attributed to Bede; psalm prologues and biblical canticles and psalm prayers).
McNamara, Martin, “The Irish Biblical Association and its publication committee”, Proceedings of the Irish Biblical Association 25 (2002): 9–17.
McNamara, Martin, “The newly-identified Cambridge Apocalypse commentary and the Reference bible: a preliminary inquiry”, Peritia 15 (2001): 208–260.  
abstract:
A discussion of the newly discovered commentary on the Apocalypse in Cambridge, University Library, Dd X 16 (s. x, probably of Breton provenance) and a comparison of its text with that of the Reference bible (c.AD 750). Three extensive passages of both texts are cited as the basis for comparison. In addition, there is a general discussion of commentaries on the Apocalypse and of the possible sources of the Cambridge commentary.
abstract:
A discussion of the newly discovered commentary on the Apocalypse in Cambridge, University Library, Dd X 16 (s. x, probably of Breton provenance) and a comparison of its text with that of the Reference bible (c.AD 750). Three extensive passages of both texts are cited as the basis for comparison. In addition, there is a general discussion of commentaries on the Apocalypse and of the possible sources of the Cambridge commentary.
McNamara, Martin, “The Bible in academe and in ecclesia: Antiochene and early Irish exegesis of Messianic Psalms”, Milltown Studies 39 (1997): 112–129.
McNamara, Martin, “Psalm 16 in the Bible, in earlier and Irish tradition”, Milltown Studies 36 (1995): 52–63.
McNamara, Martin, “Midrash, apocrypha, culture medium and development of doctrine: some facts in quest of a terminology”, Apocrypha: International Journal of Apocryphal Literatures 6 (1995): 127–164.  
abstract:
Midrash has been traditionally regarded as something specifically Jewish and rabbinic, but later as a reality found already in the Hebrew Scriptures and present also in New Testament writings. In this essay the more recent debates regarding the nature of midrash are examined in the larger context of inner-biblical exegesis and against the background of canonical process. Some midrash-type features or techniques are examined and these are seen to be found also in apocryphal and traditional Christian commentary literature. In the light of this there is a consideration of the reflection on the afterlife in Irish apocrypha and Irish theological treatises.
abstract:
Midrash has been traditionally regarded as something specifically Jewish and rabbinic, but later as a reality found already in the Hebrew Scriptures and present also in New Testament writings. In this essay the more recent debates regarding the nature of midrash are examined in the larger context of inner-biblical exegesis and against the background of canonical process. Some midrash-type features or techniques are examined and these are seen to be found also in apocryphal and traditional Christian commentary literature. In the light of this there is a consideration of the reflection on the afterlife in Irish apocrypha and Irish theological treatises.
McNamara, Martin, “The Celtic-Irish mixed gospel text: some recent contributions and centennial reflections”, Filologia mediolatina 2 (1995): 69–108.
McNamara, Martin, “Sources and affiliations of the Catechesis Celtica (MS Vat. Reg. lat. 49)”, Sacris Erudiri 34 (1994): 185–237.
McNamara, Martin, “Monastic schools in Ireland and Northumbria before A.D. 750”, Milltown Studies 25 (1990): 19–36.
McNamara, Martin, “The Irish affiliations of the Catechesis Celtica”, Celtica 21 (1990): 291–334.
McNamara, Martin, “Celtic Christianity, Creation and Apocalypse, Christ and Antichrist”, Milltown Studies 23 (1989): 5–39.
McNamara, Martin, “The bird hiruath of the Ever-New Tongue and hirodius of gloss on Ps. 103:17 in Vatican Codex Pal. Lat. 68”, Ériu 39 (1988): 87–97.
McNamara, Martin, “The Echternach and Mac Durnan Gospels: some common readings and their significance”, Peritia 6–7 (1988): 217–222.
McNamara, Martin, “The inverted eucharistic formula Conversio corporis Christi in panem et sanguinis in vinum: the exegetical and liturgical background in Irish usage”, Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy 87 C (1987): 573–593.  
abstract:
In the Leabhar breac bilingual homily (probably of eleventh-century origin) entitled 'In cena Domini' we find the curious expression Conuersio corporis et sanguinis [Christi] in panem et uinum, the exact opposite of what one would have expected. Since the Irish translation of this is quite different, and for us traditional ('the pure mysteries of his own Body and Blood under the species of bread and wine'), a simple scribal error might be suspected. This, however, is rendered less likely by the presence of the same unexpected formulation in Irish in another more or less contemporary composition in the Leabhar breac, the 'Instruction on the Sacraments'. The Irish Latin formula is probably best explained as a later development of such earlier Latin formulations as Transfiguratio [or transformatio] corporis Christi in panem et sanguinis in uinum, used in liturgical (with transformatio) and non-liturgical (with transfiguratio) texts. Early Hiberno-Latin exegetical and homiletic texts, in particular, make frequent use of the transfiguratio formula, and in contexts closely related with the Leabhar breac homily 'In cena Domini'. The present paper studies the general use of the liturgical formula and the Hiberno-Latin texts, and goes on to suggest ways in which this could have developed to give us the Leabhar breac Latin and Irish formulation.
abstract:
In the Leabhar breac bilingual homily (probably of eleventh-century origin) entitled 'In cena Domini' we find the curious expression Conuersio corporis et sanguinis [Christi] in panem et uinum, the exact opposite of what one would have expected. Since the Irish translation of this is quite different, and for us traditional ('the pure mysteries of his own Body and Blood under the species of bread and wine'), a simple scribal error might be suspected. This, however, is rendered less likely by the presence of the same unexpected formulation in Irish in another more or less contemporary composition in the Leabhar breac, the 'Instruction on the Sacraments'. The Irish Latin formula is probably best explained as a later development of such earlier Latin formulations as Transfiguratio [or transformatio] corporis Christi in panem et sanguinis in uinum, used in liturgical (with transformatio) and non-liturgical (with transfiguratio) texts. Early Hiberno-Latin exegetical and homiletic texts, in particular, make frequent use of the transfiguratio formula, and in contexts closely related with the Leabhar breac homily 'In cena Domini'. The present paper studies the general use of the liturgical formula and the Hiberno-Latin texts, and goes on to suggest ways in which this could have developed to give us the Leabhar breac Latin and Irish formulation.
McNamara, Martin, “Ireland and Northumbria as illustrated by a Vatican manuscript”, Thought 54 (1979): 274–290.
McNamara, Martin, “Sources of early Irish theology. The apocrypha. The canon of scripture”, Milltown Studies 2 (1978): 58–69.
McNamara, Martin, “The Bible in Ireland (AD 600–1150)”, Scripture Bulletin 6:2 (1975–1976): 36–39.
McNamara, Martin, “Psalter text and Psalter study in the early Irish Church (A.D. 600-1200)”, Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy 71 C (1973): 201–298.
McNamara, Martin, “A plea for Hiberno-Latin studies”, Irish Theological Quarterly 39:4 (1972): 337–353.
McNamara, Martin, “Notes on the Irish Gospel of Thomas”, Irish Theological Quarterly 38 (1971): 42–66.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

McNamara, Martin, “Irish”, in: Kulik, Alexander, Gabriele Boccaccini, Lorenzo DiTommaso, David Hamidovic, Michael Stone, and Jason Zurawski (eds), A guide to early Jewish text and traditions in Christian transmission, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2019. 211–236.  
abstract:
In the early Irish Church (600–800 CE) there were apocrypha of Oriental origin and in the tenth-century poem Saltair na Rann (“Psalter of Quatrains”) the account of the Fall of Adam and Eve is recognized as having analogues with rabbinic tradition and also a poem on Adam’s head. This essay first considers Jewish texts that have, or may have, influenced Irish tradition. Jewish influence on Irish traditions is then considered: Latin conjoined treatises on Adam and Eve; Adam created in agro Damasceno, in the field of Damascus; the seven or eight parts from which Adam was made; the four elements from which Adam was made (with rabbinic analogues); the naming of Adam (Slavonic Enoch and Sibylline Oracles 3:24–26); Penance of Adam and Eve; Sunday, Sabbath, respite for the damned; XV Signs before Doomsday; Jewish traditions in Saltair na Rann; the influence of Hebrew Bible traditions on early Irish genealogies and imagined prehistory.
(source: Oxford Scholarship Online)
abstract:
In the early Irish Church (600–800 CE) there were apocrypha of Oriental origin and in the tenth-century poem Saltair na Rann (“Psalter of Quatrains”) the account of the Fall of Adam and Eve is recognized as having analogues with rabbinic tradition and also a poem on Adam’s head. This essay first considers Jewish texts that have, or may have, influenced Irish tradition. Jewish influence on Irish traditions is then considered: Latin conjoined treatises on Adam and Eve; Adam created in agro Damasceno, in the field of Damascus; the seven or eight parts from which Adam was made; the four elements from which Adam was made (with rabbinic analogues); the naming of Adam (Slavonic Enoch and Sibylline Oracles 3:24–26); Penance of Adam and Eve; Sunday, Sabbath, respite for the damned; XV Signs before Doomsday; Jewish traditions in Saltair na Rann; the influence of Hebrew Bible traditions on early Irish genealogies and imagined prehistory.
(source: Oxford Scholarship Online)
McNamara, Martin, “The multifaceted transmission of the Bible in Ireland, A.D. 550-1200 CE”, in: Anderson, Bradford A., and Jonathan Kearney (eds), Ireland and the reception of the Bible: social and cultural perspectives, London, New York: Bloomsbury, 2018. 25–42.
McNamara, Martin, “The ‘Leabhar Breac gospel history’ against its Hiberno-Latin background”, in: Guldentops, Guy, Christian Laes, and Gert Partoens (eds), Felici curiositate: studies in Latin literature and textual criticism from antiquity to the twentieth century: in honour of Rita Beyers, Instrumenta patristica et mediaevalia 72, Turnhout: Brepols, 2017. 23–54.  
abstract:
The text known as the ‘Leabhar Breac gospel history’ is a vernacular Irish text, introduced by synchronisms and miraculous events at Christ’s birth, followed by apocryphal Infancy Narratives from the journey from Nazareth to Bethlehem over the birth of Jesus, the episode of the Magi, the flight into Egypt and the sojourn there, to the death of Herod and the murder of Zacharias, John’s father. After this come four unpublished texts on the public life of Jesus: the baptism of Christ, the finding of the apostles, the household of Christ, and Christ’s first sermon, ending, in some versions, with an account of the destruction of Jerusalem (‘The Avenging of Christ’s Blood’). This article concentrates on the sources behind these four texts, sources ranging from apocryphal to early and medieval Hiberno-Latin texts, making for a study of the understanding and the transmission of Bible learning in Ireland from the eighth to the thirteenth century - in Latin and vernacular Irish.
abstract:
The text known as the ‘Leabhar Breac gospel history’ is a vernacular Irish text, introduced by synchronisms and miraculous events at Christ’s birth, followed by apocryphal Infancy Narratives from the journey from Nazareth to Bethlehem over the birth of Jesus, the episode of the Magi, the flight into Egypt and the sojourn there, to the death of Herod and the murder of Zacharias, John’s father. After this come four unpublished texts on the public life of Jesus: the baptism of Christ, the finding of the apostles, the household of Christ, and Christ’s first sermon, ending, in some versions, with an account of the destruction of Jerusalem (‘The Avenging of Christ’s Blood’). This article concentrates on the sources behind these four texts, sources ranging from apocryphal to early and medieval Hiberno-Latin texts, making for a study of the understanding and the transmission of Bible learning in Ireland from the eighth to the thirteenth century - in Latin and vernacular Irish.
McNamara, Martin, “Irish apocryphal and related texts on the public life of Jesus and on the passion narratives”, in: Ubierna, Pablo A., Francesca Prometea Barone, and Caroline Macé (eds), Philologie, herméneutique et histoire des textes entre Orient et Occident: mélanges en hommage à Sever J. Voicu, Instrumenta patristica et mediaevalia 73, Turnhout: Brepols, 2017. 613–640.
McNamara, Martin, “Jesus in (early) Irish apocryphal gospel traditions”, in: Frey, Jörg, and Jens Schröter (eds), Jesus in apokryphen Evangelienüberlieferung: Beiträge zur außerkanonischen Jesusüberlieferungen aus verschiedenen Sprach- und Kulturtraditionen, Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zum Neuen Testament 254, Tübingen: Mohr Siebeck, 2010. 685–739.
McNamara, Martin, and Charles D. Wright [app.], “The (fifteen) signs before Doomsday in Irish tradition”, in: Papieski Wydział Teologiczny w Warszawie (ed.), Miscellanea Patristica Reverendissimo Marco Starowieyski septuagenario professori illustrissimo viro amplissimo ac doctissimo oblata, Warszawskie Studia Teologiczne 20.2, Warsaw: Papieski Wydział Teologiczny w Warszawie, 2007. 223–254.
McNamara, Martin, “Navigatio sancti Brendani. Some possible connections with liturgical, apocryphal and Irish tradition”, in: Strijbosch, Clara, and Glyn S. Burgess (eds.), The Brendan legend. Texts and versions, The Northern World 24, Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2006. 159–191.
McNamara, Martin, “The Latin gospels, with special reference to Irish tradition”, in: Horton, Charles (ed.), The earliest gospels: the origins and transmission of the earliest gospels. The contribution of the Chester Beatty gospel codex P45, Journal for the Study of the New Testament Supplement Series 258, London, New York: T & T Clark, 2004. 88–106.
McNamara, Martin, “Apocalyptic and eschatological texts in Irish literature: oriental connections?”, in: McNamara, Martin (ed.), Apocalyptic and eschatological heritage: the Middle East and Celtic realms, Dublin and Portland: Four Courts Press, 2003. 75–97.
McNamara, Martin, “The Irish legend of Antichrist”, in: García Martínez, Florentino, and Gerard P. Luttikhuizen (eds), Jerusalem, Alexandria, Rome: studies in ancient intercultural interaction in honour of A. Hilhorst, Supplements to the Journal for the Study of Judaism 82, Leiden: Brill, 2003. 201–219.
McNamara, Martin, “Apocryphal infancy narratives: European and Irish transmission”, in: Ní Chatháin, Próinséas, and Michael Richter (eds.), Ireland and Europe in the early Middle Ages: texts and transmissions / Irland und Europa im früheren Mittelalter: Texte und Überlieferung, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2002. 123–146.
McNamara, Martin, “Irish homilies A.D. 600–1100”, in: Hall, Thomas N. [ed.], and Thomas D. Hill [ass. ed.], Via Crucis: essays on early medieval sources and ideas in memory of J. E. Cross, Medieval European Studies 1, Morgantown: West Virginia University Press, 2002. 235–284.
McNamara, Martin, “Sankt Gallen Stiftsbibliothek codex 51: with special reference to the biblical text of the fourth Gospel”, in: Richter, Michael, and Jean-Michel Picard (eds.), Ogma: essays in Celtic studies in honour of Próinséas Ní Chatháin, Dublin: Four Courts, 2002. 262–267.
McNamara, Martin, “Bible text and illumination in St Gall Stiftsbibliothek Codex 51, with special reference to Longinus in the Crucifixion scene”, in: Redknap, Mark, Nancy Edwards, Susan Youngs, Alan Lane, and Jeremy K. Knight (eds.), Pattern and purpose in Insular art. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Insular Art held at the National Museum & Gallery, Cardiff 3–6 September 1998, Oxford: Oxbow Books, 2001. 191–202.
Herbert, Máire [intr., ed., tr.], and Martin McNamara [intr., notes], “A versified narrative of the childhood deeds of the Lord Jesus”, in: Breatnach, Caoimhín, John Carey, Brian Ó Cuív, Pádraig Ó Fiannachta, Martin McNamara, Jean-Daniel Kaestli, and Diarmuid Ó Laoghaire (eds), Apocrypha Hiberniae, part I: Evangelia infantiae, 2 vols, vol. 1, Corpus Christianorum, Series Apocryphorum 13, Turnhout: Brepols, 2001. 441–483.
McNamara, Martin, “Introduction to Glossa in Psalmos: the Hiberno-Latin gloss on the Psalms of Codex Palatinus Latinus 68” [1986], in: McNamara, Martin, The Psalms in the early Irish Church, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Supplement Series 165, Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 2000. 165–238.  
comments: A reprint of the introduction to McNamara 1986a
comments: A reprint of the introduction to McNamara 1986a
McNamara, Martin, “Tradition and creativity in early Irish Psalter study”, in: McNamara, Martin, The Psalms in the early Irish Church, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Supplement Series 165, Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 2000. 239–301.
McNamara, Martin, and Maurice Sheehy [appendices], “Psalter text and Psalter study in the early Irish Church (A.D. 600-1200)” [1973], in: McNamara, Martin, The Psalms in the early Irish Church, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Supplement Series 165, Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 2000. 19–142.
McNamara, Martin, “The Psalter in early Irish monastic spirituality”, in: McNamara, Martin, The Psalms in the early Irish Church, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Supplement Series 165, Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 2000. 353–377.
McNamara, Martin, “Christology and the interpretation of the psalms in the early Irish church”, in: McNamara, Martin, The Psalms in the early Irish Church, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Supplement Series 165, Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 2000. 378–416.
McNamara, Martin, “Some affiliations of the St Columba series of psalm headings: a preliminary study”, in: McNamara, Martin, The Psalms in the early Irish Church, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Supplement Series 165, Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 2000. 302–352.
McNamara, Martin, “The Irish affiliations of the Catechesis Celtica” [1990], in: McNamara, Martin, The Psalms in the early Irish Church, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Supplement Series 165, Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 2000. 417–469.
McNamara, Martin, “The psalms in the Irish church: the most recent research on text, commentary and decoration - with emphasis on the so-called Psalter of Charlemagne”, in: McNamara, Martin, The Psalms in the early Irish Church, Journal for the Study of the Old Testament, Supplement Series 165, Sheffield: Sheffield Academic Press, 2000. 143–238.
McNamara, Martin, “The affiliations and origins of the Catechesis Celtica: an ongoing quest”, in: O'Loughlin, Thomas (ed.), The Scriptures and early medieval Ireland: proceedings of the 1993 Conference of the Society for Hiberno-Latin Studies on Early Irish Exegesis and Homilectics, Instrumenta Patristica 31, Steenbrugge, Turnhout: In Abbatia S. Petri; Brepols, 1999. 179–203.
McNamara, Martin, “The Irish tradition of biblical exegesis, A.D. 550–800”, in: Riel, Gerd van, Carlos Steel, and James J. McEvoy (eds), Johannes Scottus Eriugena. The Bible and hermeneutics. Proceedings of the Ninth International Colloquium of the Society for the Promotion of Eriugenian Studies held at Leuven and Louvain-la-Neuve, June 7–10, 1995, Ancient and Medieval Philosophy 1.20, Leuven: Leuven University Press, 1996. 25–54.
McNamara, Martin, “Some aspects of early medieval Irish eschatology”, in: Ní Chatháin, Próinséas, and Michael Richter (eds.), Irland und Europa im früheren Mittelalter: Bildung und Literatur / Ireland and Europe in the early Middle Ages: learning and literature, Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta, 1996. 42–75.
McNamara, Martin, “Irish gospel texts, Amb. I 61 sup., Bible text and date of Kells”, in: O'Mahony, Felicity (ed.), The Book of Kells: proceedings of a conference at Trinity College Dublin, 6-9 September 1992, Aldershot: Scolar Press, 1994. 78–101.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 12. The Magi”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 36–42, 173–174.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 28. The seven journeys of the soul; 28B. A prose text”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 151–152, 187–188.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 16. Letter of Jesus on Sunday observance”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 50–54, 176.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 29. The signs before Doomsday”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 153–159, 188–189.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 17. The mystical tree”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 55, 176–177.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[Old Testament] 4. Death of Adam”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 12–16, 167.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[Old Testament] 7. Story of David”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 22, 169.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[Old Testament] 6. The two sorrows of the kingdom of heaven”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 19–21, 168–169.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 15. The Abgar legend”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 48–49, 175.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 10. Infancy Gospel”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 27–32, 171.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 19. Gospel of Nicodemus”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 60–88, 178–179.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 20. Texts relating to the Beloved Disciple: 20a. Episodes from the life of John, the Beloved Disciple; 20b. Fragment of an apocalypse, and death of John”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 89–98, 180–181.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 24. Transitus Mariae”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 119–131, 183–185.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[Old Testament] 1. The creation of Adam”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 1, 163–164.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 26. The vision of Adomnán”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 137–148, 185–186.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[Old Testament] 9. The deaths of the chief prophets”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 25–26, 170.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[Old Testament] 8. The power of women”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 23–24, 169–170.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 14. Infancy Gospel of Thomas”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 44–47, 174–175.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 22. The passion of the Apostle Philip”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 106–108, 182.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[Old Testament] 5. Adam and his descendants”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 17–18, 167.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 11. The wonders of the night of the Nativity; 11a. Additional related text”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 33–35, 171–173.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 13. Anecdote concerning the Magi”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 43, 174.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 23. The evernew tongue”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 109–118, 182–183.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 25. Irish text of Visio sancti Pauli”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 132–136, 185.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[Old Testament] 3. The penance of Adam”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 8, 165–166.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 21. The acts of Peter and Paul”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 99–105, 181.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[Old Testament] 2. Creation and fall”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 2–7, 165.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 27. Antichrist”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 149–150, 186–187.
Herbert, Máire [tr.], and Martin McNamara [notes], “[New Testament] 18. The death of John the Baptist”, in: Herbert, Máire, and Martin McNamara (eds), Irish biblical apocrypha: selected texts in translation, Edinburgh: Clark, 1989. 56–58, 177–178.
McNamara, Martin, “Plan and source analysis of Das Bibelwerk, Old Testament”, in: Ní Chatháin, Próinséas, and Michael Richter (eds.), Irland und die Christenheit: Bibelstudien und Mission. Ireland and Christendom: the Bible and the missions, Veröffentlichungen des Europa Zentrums Tübingen. Kulturwissenschaftliche Reihe, Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta, 1987. 84–112.
McNamara, Martin, “The text of the Latin Bible in the early Irish church: some data and desiderata”, in: Ní Chatháin, Próinséas, and Michael Richter (eds.), Irland und die Christenheit: Bibelstudien und Mission. Ireland and Christendom: the Bible and the missions, Veröffentlichungen des Europa Zentrums Tübingen. Kulturwissenschaftliche Reihe, Stuttgart: Klett-Cotta, 1987. 7–55.