Bibliography

Thomas
O'Loughlin

48 publications between 1992 and 2017 indexed
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Works authored

O'Loughlin, Thomas, Gildas and the Christian scriptures: observing the world through a biblical lens, Leiden, Boston: Brepols, 2013. 
abstract:
Gildas is the earliest insular writer who has left us a substantial legacy of theological writing. He is usually, however, not seen as a theological writer but as an historical source for ‘dark age’ Britain at the time of the Germanic invasions in the mid-sixth century. Yet the deacon Gildas saw himself as a prophet charged by God to call the rulers and clergy of his society back to being a chosen people of the covenant. The form this call took was that of an indictment of those groups based on the testimonia of the Christian scriptures. This book is a study both of Gildas’s use of the scriptures (his text, his canon, his exegetical strategies) and of how, from the way he interprets sacred history, he created a distinctive theology of the church and of salvation.
(source: Brepols)
abstract:
Gildas is the earliest insular writer who has left us a substantial legacy of theological writing. He is usually, however, not seen as a theological writer but as an historical source for ‘dark age’ Britain at the time of the Germanic invasions in the mid-sixth century. Yet the deacon Gildas saw himself as a prophet charged by God to call the rulers and clergy of his society back to being a chosen people of the covenant. The form this call took was that of an indictment of those groups based on the testimonia of the Christian scriptures. This book is a study both of Gildas’s use of the scriptures (his text, his canon, his exegetical strategies) and of how, from the way he interprets sacred history, he created a distinctive theology of the church and of salvation.
(source: Brepols)
O'Loughlin, Thomas, Adomnán and the Holy Places: the perceptions of an Insular monk on the locations of the biblical drama, London, New York: Clark, 2007.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, Celtic theology: humanity, world and God in early Irish writings, London: Continuum, 2000.

Works edited

Aist, Rodney, Thomas Owen Clancy, Thomas O'Loughlin, and Jonathan M. Wooding (eds), Adomnán of Iona: theologian, lawmaker, peacemaker, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2010.
O'Loughlin, Thomas [ed.], Adomnán at Birr, AD 697. Essays in commemoration of the Law of the Innocents, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2001.
O'Loughlin, Thomas [ed.], The Scriptures and early medieval Ireland: proceedings of the 1993 Conference of the Society for Hiberno-Latin Studies on Early Irish Exegesis and Homilectics, Instrumenta Patristica 31, Steenbrugge, Turnhout: In Abbatia S. Petri; Brepols, 1999.

Contributions to journals

O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Palestine in the aftermath of the Arab Conquest: the earliest Latin account”, Studies in Church History 36 (2000): 78–89. 
abstract:
Written, probably, in the early 680s on lona, Adomnán’s De locis sanctis has excited interest, and been used as a quarry for facts about the Holy Land, ever since. It purports to report the pilgrim experiences of a ‘bishop of the Gaulish race’ (prooemium, I), Arculf, who, when later on Iona, told of what he had seen in Palestine, Alexandria, and Constantinople. Realising his ‘scoop’, Adomnán set the details down in a permanent record. Within twenty years this formed the basis of a more concise account by Bede, who added a few details of his own about Arculf which have become standard elements of the latter’s biography: the pilgrim, returning home, was blown by a gale on to the western shores of Britain, and thence he travelled to Iona where he told his story. However, while Arculf - through either Adomnán’s or Bede’s account - is the focus of attention in scholarship using these works as evidence, Bede recognized the expertise of Adomnán in the work, and did not reduce him to the status of an amanuensis.
abstract:
Written, probably, in the early 680s on lona, Adomnán’s De locis sanctis has excited interest, and been used as a quarry for facts about the Holy Land, ever since. It purports to report the pilgrim experiences of a ‘bishop of the Gaulish race’ (prooemium, I), Arculf, who, when later on Iona, told of what he had seen in Palestine, Alexandria, and Constantinople. Realising his ‘scoop’, Adomnán set the details down in a permanent record. Within twenty years this formed the basis of a more concise account by Bede, who added a few details of his own about Arculf which have become standard elements of the latter’s biography: the pilgrim, returning home, was blown by a gale on to the western shores of Britain, and thence he travelled to Iona where he told his story. However, while Arculf - through either Adomnán’s or Bede’s account - is the focus of attention in scholarship using these works as evidence, Bede recognized the expertise of Adomnán in the work, and did not reduce him to the status of an amanuensis.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The plan of New Jerusalem in the Book of Armagh”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 39 (Summer, 2000): 23–38.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The diffusion of Adomnán’s De locis sanctis in the medieval period”, Ériu 51 (2000): 93–106.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The Eusebian apparatus in some Vulgate gospel books”, Peritia 13 (1999): 1–92.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The Celtic homily: creeds and eschatology”, Milltown Studies 41 (1998): 99–115.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Marriage and sexuality in the Hibernensis”, Peritia 11 (1997): 188–206.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Adomnán’s De locis sanctis: a textual emendation and an additional source identification”, Ériu 48 (1997): 37–40.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The Salzburg fragment of Adomnán’s De locis sanctis”, Manuscripta 41 (1997): 32–37.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The gates of hell: from metaphor to fact”, Milltown Studies 38 (1996): 98–114.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The view from Iona: Adomnán’s mental maps”, Peritia 10 (1996): 98–122. 
abstract:
Adomnán wrote a geographical work. How did he view the world around which he imagined people travelling. This raises questions about the state of contemporary geographical knowledge and whether we can assume that he shares our notions of time and space. In fact, both are different. Here mental maps are used to allow him to tell us about his world rather than about the past of ours. We can use a series to reconstruct this world: (i) a T–O map to explain the actual sequence of movement in De locis sanctis and why Arculf’s arrival in Iona did not raise any questions for him; (ii) a Square–V map of the races of mankind; (iii) a map of circles based on Luke and Acts to explain the division of De locis sanctis into books; (iv) a map of scriptural signs which would explain the temporal inconsistencies in the description of places; and (v) an eschatological map which shows the book beginning at the gates of heaven and ending at the gates of hell.
abstract:
Adomnán wrote a geographical work. How did he view the world around which he imagined people travelling. This raises questions about the state of contemporary geographical knowledge and whether we can assume that he shares our notions of time and space. In fact, both are different. Here mental maps are used to allow him to tell us about his world rather than about the past of ours. We can use a series to reconstruct this world: (i) a T–O map to explain the actual sequence of movement in De locis sanctis and why Arculf’s arrival in Iona did not raise any questions for him; (ii) a Square–V map of the races of mankind; (iii) a map of circles based on Luke and Acts to explain the division of De locis sanctis into books; (iv) a map of scriptural signs which would explain the temporal inconsistencies in the description of places; and (v) an eschatological map which shows the book beginning at the gates of heaven and ending at the gates of hell.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Adomnán and Arculf: the case of an expert witness”, The Journal of Medieval Latin 7 (1996): 127–146.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Muirchú’s Vita Patricii: a note on an unidentified source”, Ériu 47 (1996): 89–93.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Adomnán and mira rotunditas”, Ériu 47 (1996): 95–99.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Dating the De situ Hierusolimae: the Insular evidence”, Revue Bénédictine 105 (1995): 9–19.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The waters above the heavens: Isidore and the Latin tradition”, Milltown Studies 36 (1995): 104–117.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The Latin version of the Scriptures in use in Iona”, Peritia 8 (1994): 18–26.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “An Irish (?) interpolation of Caesarius of Arles’ Sermo 84”, Milltown Studies 31 (1993): 143–145.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, and Helen Conrad-O'Briain, “The ‘baptism of tears’ in early Anglo-Saxon sources”, Anglo-Saxon England 22 (1993): 65–83.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The exegetical purpose of Adomnán’s De locis sanctis”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 24 (Winter, 1992): 37–53.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The Eusebian apparatus in the Lindisfarne Gospels: Ailerán’s Kanon euangeliorum as a lens for its appreciation”, in: Gameson, Richard (ed.), The Lindisfarne Gospels: new perspectives, Library of the Written Word 57, Leiden, Boston: Brepols, 2017. 96–111.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The biblical dimension of early medieval Latin texts”, in: Ritari, Katja, and Alexandra Bergholm (eds), Understanding Celtic religion: revisiting the pagan past, New Approaches to Celtic Religion and Mythology, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2015. 83–98.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The so-called capitula for the Book of the Apocalypse in the Book of Armagh (Dublin, Trinity College, 52) and Latin exegesis”, in: Moran, Pádraic, and Immo Warntjes (eds), Early medieval Ireland and Europe: chronology, contacts, scholarship. A Festschrift for Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, Studia Traditionis Theologiae 14, Turnhout: Brepols, 2015. 405–423. 
abstract:
In the Book of Armagh, on f 159v, we find a lozenge of text which suggests a division system for the text of the New Testament’s Book of the Apocalypse. This short text, which is also found in the Metz Bible, identifies fourteen moments in the Apocalypse in a manner very similar to the way a set of capitula identifies passages within a text while dividing it into sections-and this text has traditionally been studied as one more set of textual divisions for this biblical book. However, closer examination of the text, combined with a comparison with other sets of capitula from biblical codices and summaries in exegetical handbooks suggest this text neither sections the book efficiently nor does it provide an introduction to its content. Rather, the numbered list of items proceeds visually through the book, offering the reader a guide to imagining the visions directly while knowing the narrative account of those visions is to be found in the biblical book’s text.
abstract:
In the Book of Armagh, on f 159v, we find a lozenge of text which suggests a division system for the text of the New Testament’s Book of the Apocalypse. This short text, which is also found in the Metz Bible, identifies fourteen moments in the Apocalypse in a manner very similar to the way a set of capitula identifies passages within a text while dividing it into sections-and this text has traditionally been studied as one more set of textual divisions for this biblical book. However, closer examination of the text, combined with a comparison with other sets of capitula from biblical codices and summaries in exegetical handbooks suggest this text neither sections the book efficiently nor does it provide an introduction to its content. Rather, the numbered list of items proceeds visually through the book, offering the reader a guide to imagining the visions directly while knowing the narrative account of those visions is to be found in the biblical book’s text.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Adomnán’s plans in the context of his imagining ‘the most famous city’”, in: Donkin, Lucy, and Hanna Vorholt (eds), Imagining Jerusalem in the medieval West, Proceedings of the British Academy 175, Oxford: Oxford University Press; for the British Academy, 2012. 15–40. 
abstract:
Adomnán of Iona's work on the holy places of Jerusalem and surrounding regions (De locis sanctis) has been used as a guide to seventh-century Palestine. In particular, its plans of monuments such as the Church of the Holy Sepulchre have been used by archaeologists for information about buildings, while their form interests historians of cartography. However, these plans must be read with the book's several purposes in mind. They attempt to harmonize biblical data (and Adomnán's other literary sources) visually. In addition, they project elements of Iona's monastic liturgy into an alien liturgical space. The plans are not simply illustrations to clarify the text but constitute a distinct, parallel text of their own, with elements shown that Adomnán would not have asserted in writing. They indicate that, for Adomnán, there were different orders of verification for written texts and visual materials such as plans.
abstract:
Adomnán of Iona's work on the holy places of Jerusalem and surrounding regions (De locis sanctis) has been used as a guide to seventh-century Palestine. In particular, its plans of monuments such as the Church of the Holy Sepulchre have been used by archaeologists for information about buildings, while their form interests historians of cartography. However, these plans must be read with the book's several purposes in mind. They attempt to harmonize biblical data (and Adomnán's other literary sources) visually. In addition, they project elements of Iona's monastic liturgy into an alien liturgical space. The plans are not simply illustrations to clarify the text but constitute a distinct, parallel text of their own, with elements shown that Adomnán would not have asserted in writing. They indicate that, for Adomnán, there were different orders of verification for written texts and visual materials such as plans.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The De locis sanctis as a liturgical text”, in: Aist, Rodney, Thomas Owen Clancy, Thomas O'Loughlin, and Jonathan M. Wooding (eds), Adomnán of Iona: theologian, lawmaker, peacemaker, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2010. 181–192.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The biblical text of the Book of Deer (C.U.L. Ii.6.32): evidence for the remains of a division system from its manuscript ancestry; Appendix: A concordance of the display initials of the Book of Deer with the Ammonian sections / Eusebian canons”, in: Forsythe, Katherine (ed.), Studies on the Book of Deer, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2008. 3–31 (with appendix).
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The myth of insularity and nationality in Ireland”, in: Nagy, Joseph Falaky [ed.], Myth in Celtic literatures, CSANA Yearbook 6, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2007. 132–140.
Thomas O'Loughlin, “Cáin Adomnáin”, in: John T. Koch (ed.), Celtic culture: a historical encyclopedia (2006): 327.
Thomas O'Loughlin, “Adomnán, St”, in: John T. Koch (ed.), Celtic culture: a historical encyclopedia (2006): 12–13.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Devotional and liturgical literature”, in: Duffy, Seán [ed.], Medieval Ireland: an encyclopedia, New York and London: Routledge, 2005. 123–125.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Moral and religious instruction”, in: Duffy, Seán [ed.], Medieval Ireland: an encyclopedia, New York and London: Routledge, 2005. 337–339.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Penitentials”, in: Duffy, Seán [ed.], Medieval Ireland: an encyclopedia, New York and London: Routledge, 2005. 371–372.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Canon law”, in: Duffy, Seán [ed.], Medieval Ireland: an encyclopedia, New York and London: Routledge, 2005. 63–64.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Reading Muirchú’s Tara-event within its background as a biblical ‘trial of divinities’”, in: Cartwright, Jane [ed.], Celtic hagiography and saints’ cults, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2003. 123–135.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “‘A Celtic theology’: some awkward questions and observations”, in: Nagy, Joseph Falaky [ed.], Identifying the 'Celtic', CSANA Yearbook 2, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2002. 49–65.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Adomnán: a man of many parts”, in: O'Loughlin, Thomas [ed.], Adomnán at Birr, AD 697. Essays in commemoration of the Law of the Innocents, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2001. 41–51.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The tombs of the saints: their significance for Adomnán”, in: Carey, John, Máire Herbert, and Pádraig Ó Riain (eds.), Studies in Irish hagiography: saints and scholars, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2001. 1–14.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Penitentials and pastoral care”, in: Evans, G. R. [ed.], A history of pastoral care, London: Cassell, 2000. 93–111.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Tradition and exegesis in the eighth century: the use of patristic sources in early medieval scriptural commentaries”, in: O'Loughlin, Thomas [ed.], The Scriptures and early medieval Ireland: proceedings of the 1993 Conference of the Society for Hiberno-Latin Studies on Early Irish Exegesis and Homilectics, Instrumenta Patristica 31, Steenbrugge, Turnhout: In Abbatia S. Petri; Brepols, 1999. 217–239.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Distant islands: the topography of holiness in the Nauigatio Sancti Brendani”, in: Glasscoe, Marion [ed.], The medieval mystical tradition: England, Ireland and Wales. Papers read at Charney Manor, July 1999 [Exeter Symposium VI], Woodbridge: Brewer, 1999. 1–20.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The list of classical writers in the pseudo-Bedan Collectanea”, in: Conrad-O’Briain, Helen, Anne-Marie D'Arcy, and John Scattergood (eds.), Text and gloss: studies in insular language and literature presented to Joseph Donovan Pheifer, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1999. 35–48.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “Biblical contradictions in the Periphyseon and the development of Eriugena’s method”, in: Riel, Gerd van, Carlos Steel, and James J. McEvoy (eds), Johannes Scottus Eriugena. The Bible and hermeneutics. Proceedings of the Ninth International Colloquium of the Society for the Promotion of Eriugenian Studies held at Leuven and Louvain-la-Neuve, June 7–10, 1995, Ancient and Medieval Philosophy 1.20, Leuven: Leuven University Press, 1996. 103–126.
O'Loughlin, Thomas, “The Latin sources of medieval Irish culture: a partial status quaestionis”, in: McCone, Kim R., and Katharine Simms (eds.), Progress in medieval Irish studies, Maynooth: Department of Old Irish, St. Patrick's College, 1996. 91–105.