Bibliography

William
O'Sullivan
s. xx / s. xxi

22 publications between 1956 and 2009 indexed
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Contributions to journals

O'Sullivan, William, “The Book of Domhnall Ó Duibhdábhoireann: provenance and codicology”, Celtica 23 (1999): 276–299.
O'Sullivan, William, “A finding list of Sir James Ware’s manuscripts”, Proceedings of the Royal Irish Academy 97 C:2 (1997): 69–99.  
abstract:
This paper discusses the collection of manuscripts built up by the Irish historian Sir James Ware (1594-1666) and is particularly concerned to trace its descent through a complicated series of book sales and to establish, where possible, the present whereabouts of the manuscripts. Ware's Catalogus is reproduced in full.
abstract:
This paper discusses the collection of manuscripts built up by the Irish historian Sir James Ware (1594-1666) and is particularly concerned to trace its descent through a complicated series of book sales and to establish, where possible, the present whereabouts of the manuscripts. Ware's Catalogus is reproduced in full.
O'Sullivan, William, “Correspondence of David Rothe and James Ussher, 1619-23”, Collectanea Hibernica 36–37 (1994): 7–49.
O'Sullivan, William, “The Lindisfarne scriptorium: for and against”, Peritia 8 (1994): 80–94.  
abstract:

This paper addresses difficult and much-disputed questions concerning the provenance, dating, and inter-relationships of the great Insular gospels—Lindisfarne, Durham, Echternach, Durrow, Kells and others. It rejects Brown’s hypothesis about the Lindisfarne scriptorium, viz. that the Lindisfarne, Durham and Echternach Gospels were written there, the latter two by the scribe-artist called the ‘Durham-Echternach calligrapher’. The similarities of Echternach and Durham are best explained by their common roots in Ireland, and the development of Insular majuscule took place in Ireland, not Northumbria. The critical importance of Rath Melsigi, its daughter house Echternach, and the Echternach group of manuscripts is duly stressed.

abstract:

This paper addresses difficult and much-disputed questions concerning the provenance, dating, and inter-relationships of the great Insular gospels—Lindisfarne, Durham, Echternach, Durrow, Kells and others. It rejects Brown’s hypothesis about the Lindisfarne scriptorium, viz. that the Lindisfarne, Durham and Echternach Gospels were written there, the latter two by the scribe-artist called the ‘Durham-Echternach calligrapher’. The similarities of Echternach and Durham are best explained by their common roots in Ireland, and the development of Insular majuscule took place in Ireland, not Northumbria. The critical importance of Rath Melsigi, its daughter house Echternach, and the Echternach group of manuscripts is duly stressed.

O'Sullivan, William, “The Book of Uí Maine formerly the Book of Ó Dubhagáin: scripts and structure”, Éigse 23 (1989): 151–166.
O'Sullivan, William, “Insular calligraphy: current state and problems”, Peritia 4 (1985): 346–359.  
comments: Reviews The Irish hand (1984) by Timothy O'Neill
comments: Reviews The Irish hand (1984) by Timothy O'Neill
O'Sullivan, William, “Ciothruadh’s Yellow Book of Lecan”, Éigse 18:2 (1981): 177–181.
O'Sullivan, William, “The Irish manuscripts in case H in Trinity College Dublin catalogued by Matthew Young in 1781”, Celtica 11 (1976): 229–250.
O'Sullivan, Anne, and William O'Sullivan, “Three notes on Laud Misc. 610 (or the Book of Pottlerath)”, Celtica 9 (1971): 135–151.
O'Sullivan, Anne, and William O'Sullivan, “A legal fragment”, Celtica 8 (1968): 140–143.
O'Sullivan, William, “Notes on the scripts and make-up of the Book of Leinster”, Celtica 7 (1966): 1–31.
O'Sullivan, Anne, and William O'Sullivan, “Edward Lhuyd’s collection of Irish manuscripts”, Transactions of the Honourable Society of Cymmrodorion 1962 (1962): 57–76.
Welsh Journals Online: <link>
O'Sullivan, William, “Ussher as a collector of manuscripts”, Hermathena 88 (1956): 34–58.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

O'Sullivan, William, “O'Conor, Charles (1764–1828)”, Oxford dictionary of national biography, Online: Oxford University Press. URL: <http://www.oxforddnb.com/view/article/20526>.
O'Sullivan, William, “Manuscripts and palaeography”, in: Ó Cróinín, Dáibhí [ed.], A new history of Ireland, vol. 1: Prehistoric and early Ireland, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005. 511–548.
O'Sullivan, William, “The manuscript collection of Dubhaltach Mac Fhirbhisigh”, in: Smyth, Alfred P. (ed.), Seanchas. Studies in early and medieval Irish archaeology, history and literature in honour of Francis J. Byrne, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2000. 439–447.
O'Sullivan, William, “The Irish ‘remnaunt’ of John Bale’s manuscripts”, in: Beadle, Richard, and Alan J. Piper (eds.), New science out of old books: studies in manuscripts and early printed books in honour of A. I. Doyle, Aldershot: Scolar Press, 1995. 374–387.
O'Sullivan, William, “Two Clogher constitutions”, in: Jones, Tegwyn, and E. B. Fryde (eds), Ysgrifau a cherddi cyflwynedig i Daniel Huws: Essays and poems presented to Daniel Huws, Aberystwyth: National Library of Wales, 1994. 351–372.
O'Sullivan, William, “The palaeographical background to the Book of Kells”, in: O'Mahony, Felicity (ed.), The Book of Kells: proceedings of a conference at Trinity College Dublin, 6-9 September 1992, Aldershot: Scolar Press, 1994. 175–182.
O'Sullivan, William, “The Book of Kells”, in: s.n. (ed.), Great books of Ireland: Thomas Davis lectures, Dublin, London: Clonmore & Reynolds; Burns & Oates, 1967. 14–25.
Dolley, R. H. M., and William O'Sullivan, “The chronology of the first Anglo-Irish coinage”, in: Rynne, Etienne [ed.], North Munster studies: essays in commemoration of Monsignor Michael Moloney, Limerick: Thomond Archaeological Society, 1967. 437–478.

As honouree

Barnard, Toby, Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, and Katharine Simms (eds.), ‘A miracle of learning’: studies in manuscripts and Irish learning. Essays in honour of William O’Sullivan, Aldershot: Ashgate, 1998.

As honouree

Barnard, Toby, Dáibhí Ó Cróinín, and Katharine Simms (eds.), ‘A miracle of learning’: studies in manuscripts and Irish learning. Essays in honour of William O’Sullivan, Aldershot: Ashgate, 1998.