Bibliography

Erich
Poppe

69 publications between 1985 and 2018 indexed
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Works authored

Poppe, Erich, and Regine Reck, Selections from Ystorya Bown o Hamtwn, The Library of Medieval Welsh Literature 2, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2009.
Poppe, Erich, Of cycles and other critical matters: some issues in medieval Irish literary history and criticism, E. C. Quiggin Memorial Lectures 9, Cambridge: Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, University of Cambridge, 2008.
Poppe, Erich, A new introduction to Imtheachta Æniasa: The Irish Æneid: the classical epic from an Irish perspective, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series 3, London: Irish Texts Society, 1995.
Internet Archive: <link>
Fife, James, and Erich Poppe (eds.), Studies in Brythonic word order, Amsterdam Studies in the Theory and History of Linguistic Science 4.83, Amsterdam: Benjamins, 1991.
Poppe, Erich, Untersuchungen zur Wortstellung im Mittelkymrischen. Temporalbestimmungen und funktionale Satzperspektive, Hamburg: Buske, 1991.
Work based on the author's Habilitationsschrift for the University of Marburg (1989).
Poppe, Erich, Multiplex sane linguarum ac dialectorum varietas: zur Quellen-rekonstruktion im Mithridates (1555) des Konrad Gessner am Beispiel des Keltischen, Arbeitsberichte 6, Münster: Institut für Allgemeine Sprachwissenschaft der Westfälischen Wilhelms-Universität, 1986.

Works edited

Poppe, Erich, Karin Stüber, and Paul Widmer (eds), Referential properties and their impact on the syntax of Insular Celtic languages, Studien und Texte zur Keltologie 14, Münster: Nodus Publikationen, 2017.
Rekdal, Jan Erik, and Erich Poppe (eds), Medieval Irish perspectives on cultural memory, Studien und Texte zur Keltologie 11, Münster: Nodus Publikationen, 2014.
Poppe, Erich [ed.], Keltologie heute: Themen und Fragestellungen. Akten des 3. Deutschen Keltologensymposiums, Marburg, März 2001, Studien und Texte zur Keltologie 6, Münster: Nodus, 2004.
Poppe, Erich, and Hildegard L. C. Tristram (eds.), Übersetzung, Adaptation und Akkulturation im insularen Mittelalter, Studien und Texte zur Keltologie 4, Münster: Nodus Publikationen, 1999.
Poppe, Erich, and Bianca Ross (eds.), The legend of Mary of Egypt in medieval insular hagiography, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1996.
Ball, Martin J., James Fife, Erich Poppe, and Jenny Rowland (eds.), Celtic linguistics / Ieithyddiaeth Geltaidd: readings in the Brythonic languages. Festschrift for T. Arwyn Watkins, Amsterdam Studies in the Theory and History of Linguistic Science 4.68, Current Issues in Linguistic Theory, Amsterdam: Benjamins, 1990.
comments: The volume is divided into four sections:
  1. Studies in Welsh linguistics (with contributions by Evans, Awbery, Thomas, Thomas, Jones, Fife, Borsley and Ball)
  2. Studies in Breton and Cornish linguistics (Humphreys, Stevens, Hewitt, Timm, Hennessey, George and Williams)
  3. Studies in literary linguistics (Sims-Williams, Haycock, Rowland, Tristram and Caerwyn Williams)
  4. Studies in historical linguistics (Zimmer, Harvey, Mac Cana, Meid, Hamp and Poppe).

Contributions to journals

Poppe, Erich, “Writing systems and cultural identity: ogam in medieval and early modern Ireland”, Language and History 61:1-2 (2018): 23–38.
abstract:
Ogam is a writing system invented for the Irish language and originally used as a monument script in inscriptions on stone in Ireland and western Britain between the fifth (or late fourth) and the seventh centuries. Even though it was no longer used as a means of communication after the eighth century, it became an emblem of linguistic and cultural identity for medieval and early modern Irish scholars and poets because of its distinctive form, structure and letter names. The paper describes the characteristics of ogam as a script system and traces its place in medieval learned traditions about the origin and status of the Irish language and its alphabet, its use as a terminological tool for descriptions of Irish grammar and phonology, and its contribution to the construction of cultural memory and identity.
Poppe, Erich, “Patterns of Welsh punctuation from manuscript to print, 1346-1620: a pilot-study of the Annunciation narrative”, Studia Celtica 52 (2018): 123–136.
abstract:
The paper presents an analysis of patterns of punctuation in four manuscript versions of the Annunciation narrative (Luke 1:26–38) dating to the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries and in four printed translations of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, looking at the repertoire of the forms of punctuation available and at their employment. There is no continuation between the period of manuscript and print. The density of punctuation varies considerably in the manuscripts, and the print versions generally employ more punctuation than the manuscripts. A trend in the print versions can be observed for a consolidation of the inventory of punctuation symbols. In the period under discussion, some fuzziness and variation remain with regard to their use, particularly of the colon and of the formats for the marking of direct speech. This small-scale test case is intended to indicate the potential of researching patterns of (ir)regularities underlying the distribution of punctuation marks.
Scherschel, Ricarda, Paul Widmer, and Erich Poppe, “Towards a multivariate classification of event noun constructions in Middle Welsh”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 19 (2018): 31–68.
abstract:
This article proposes a classification of Middle Welsh constructions with event nouns, the only productive non-finite verbal category in this language. It is based on a catalogue of criteria which have been suggested in General Linguistics for a description of linked states of affairs, viz. variables that relate to the assertive profile, the semantic dependence, coordination, the syntactic level of attachment, the degree of deverbalization, the degree of nominalization, and negation operator scope. The survey shows that Middle Welsh event nominalizations on their own assume functions covered by different non-finite structures known from related Indo-European languages (e.g., participles, verbal nouns, supines, infinitives, compounds etc.). Furthermore, event nominalizations substantially contribute to the construction of narratives on a higher level of syntactic organization.
Erich Poppe, “[Review of: Ann Dooley (ed.) • Sarah Sheehan (ed.), Constructing gender in medieval Ireland (2013)]”, in: Bernhard Maier (ed.) • Jürgen Uhlich (ed.) • Torsten Meißner (ed.), Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 63 (2016): 290–293.
Poppe, Erich, “How to achieve an optimal textual fit in Middle Welsh clauses”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 68 (Winter, 2014): 69–100.
Poppe, Erich, “Y’r bordeu yd aethant: locative adverbs in Middle Welsh prose, their placement and pragmatics”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 14 (2012): 31–66.
Erich Poppe, “[Review of: Sharon Arbuthnot (ed.) • Geraldine Parsons (ed.), The Gaelic Finn tradition (2012)]”, in: Stefan Zimmer (ed.) • Jürgen Uhlich (ed.) • Torsten Meißner (ed.), Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 59 (2012): 234.
Erich Poppe, “[Review of: John Carey (ed.), Lebor gabála Érenn: textual history and pseudohistory (2009)]”, in: Studia Hibernica 36 (2009–2010): 215–218.
Poppe, Erich, “The matter of Troy and insular versions of Dares’s De excidio Troiae historia: an exercise in textual typology”, Beiträge zur Geschichte der Sprachwissenschaft 19:2 (2009): 252–299.
Poppe, Erich, “Standard Average European and the Celticity of English intensifiers and reflexives: some considerations and implications”, English Language and Linguistics 13:2 (2009): 251–266.
Poppe, Erich, “Expressions of negative polarity in the Middle Welsh Ystorya Bown de Hamtwn”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 13 (2009): 117–130.
Poppe, Erich, and Regine Reck, “A French romance in Wales: Ystorya Bown o Hamtwn: processes of medieval translations [Part II]”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 56 (2008): 129–164.
Poppe, Erich, “Johann Kaspar Zeuß und die ‘keltische’ Sprachforschung des 19. Jahrhunderts”, Keltische Forschungen 2 (2007): 105–139.
Poppe, Erich, and Regine Reck, “A French romance in Wales: Ystorya Bown o Hamtwn: processes of medieval translations [Part I]”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 55 (2006): 122–180.
Poppe, Erich, “Lexicalization of transitive ‘to have’ in Breton and Cornish”, in: Smelik, Bernadette, Rijcklof Hofman, Camiel Hamans, and David Cram (eds.), A companion in linguistics: a Festschrift for Anders Ahlqvist on the occasion of his sixtieth birthday, Nijmegen: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 2005. 171–184.
Poppe, Erich, “Owein, Ystorya Bown, and the problem of ‘relative distance’: some methodological considerations and speculations”, Arthurian Literature 21 (2004): 73–94.
Poppe, Erich, “Personal names and an insular tradition of Pseudo-Dares”, Ériu 53 (2003): 53–59.
Poppe, Erich, “Beues of Hamtoun in Welsh bardic poetry”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 43 (Summer, 2002): 49–58.
Poppe, Erich, “Imtheachta Aeniasa: Virgil’s Aeneid in medieval Ireland”, Classics Ireland 11 (2001). URL: <http://www.classicsireland.com/2004/poppe.html>.
Poppe, Erich, “Three textual notes on the Welsh Life of St David”, Studia Celtica 34 (2000): 275–278.
Poppe, Erich [ed. and tr.], “Cormac’s metrical testament: ‘Mithig techt tar mo thimna’”, Celtica 23 (1999): 300–311.
Celt.dias.ie – Celtica 23: <link> Celt.dias.ie – PDF (without the text edition): <link>
Poppe, Erich, “Reconstructing medieval Irish literary theory: the lesson of Airec Menman Uraird maic Coise”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 37 (Summer, 1999): 33–54.
Poppe, Erich, “Stair Nuadat Find Femin: Eine irische Romanze?”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 49–50 (1997): 749–759.
Poppe, Erich, “Convergence and divergence: the emergence of a ‘future’ in the British languages”, Transactions of the Philological Society 94 (1996, 1996): 119–160.
abstract:
The future paradigms of Modern Welsh and Modern Breton have historically different sources, the present indicative and present subjunctive respectively. This article presents evidence for the uses of these paradigms in medieval texts, from an earlier stage in the process of grammaticalization of the future. An explanation for the present and future readings of Middle Welsh verbs is suggested which is based on the inherent aspectuality of the verb, and some typological parallels for the developments in Welsh and Breton are discussed.
Poppe, Erich, “Deception and self-deception in Fingal Rónáin”, Ériu 47 (1996): 137–151.
Poppe, Erich, “Negation in Welsh and ‘Jespersen’s Cycle’”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 4 (March 1995, 1996): 99–107.
Poppe, Erich, “The pragmatics of complex sentences: interpreting the position of temporal clauses in Early Irish”, Journal of Celtic Linguistics 3 (May, 1994): 1–32.
Poppe, Erich, “The Celtic languages in Conrad Gessner’s Mithridates (1555)”, Zeitschrift für celtische Philologie 45 (1992): 240–250.
Poppe, Erich, “The Early Modern Irish version of Beves of Hamtoun”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 23 (Summer, 1992): 77–98.
Poppe, Erich, “The list of sureties in Cáin Éimíne”, Celtica 21 (1990): 588–592.
Poppe, Erich, “A new edition of Cáin Éimíne Báin”, Celtica 18 (1986): 35–52.
Poppe, Erich, “A Middle Irish poem on Éimíne’s bell”, Celtica 17 (1985): 59–72.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Poppe, Erich, “Arthur in Celtic tradition”, in: Carey, John [ed.], The matter of Britain in medieval Ireland: reassessments, Irish Texts Society, Subsidiary Series 29, London: Irish Texts Society, 2017.
Poppe, Erich, “How to resolve under-determination in Middle Welsh verbal-noun phrases”, in: Poppe, Erich, Karin Stüber, and Paul Widmer (eds), Referential properties and their impact on the syntax of Insular Celtic languages, Studien und Texte zur Keltologie 14, Münster: Nodus Publikationen, 2017. 179–200.
Poppe, Erich, “Cultural transfer and textual migration: Sir Bevis comes to Ireland”, in: Keller, Wolfram R., and Dagmar Schlüter (eds), ‘A fantastic and abstruse Latinity?’: Hiberno-Continental cultural and literary interactions in the Middle Ages, Studien und Texte zur Keltologie 12, Münster: Nodus Publikationen, 2017. 205–220.
Poppe, Erich, “Caide máthair bréithre ‘What is the mother of a word’: thinking about words in medieval Ireland”, in: Hayden, Deborah, and Paul Russell (eds), Grammatica, gramadach and gramadeg: vernacular grammar and grammarians in medieval Ireland and Wales, Studies in the History of the Language Sciences 125, Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 2016. 65–84.
abstract:
This chapter explores some of the ways in which medieval Irish scholars thought about the linguistic concept of the word. Starting points are (i) the observation that they have been credited with the implementation of forms of word division in scribal practice and (ii) the question of whether they perceived of the word as a lexical unit or as a stress group, or mot phonétique, since it is the latter which is reflected in scribal practice as well as in the terminology for case-forms of nouns in at least one grammaticographical tradition. The main themes addressed are the internal structures of the longest octosyllabic words possible in Irish, the production of speech sounds in the body which result in words, and the semantic range of lexemes that are used inter alia to denote the linguistic unit word.
Poppe, Erich, “The epic styles of In cath catharda: imitatio, amplificatio, and aemulatio”, in: Harlos, Axel, and Neele Harlos (eds), Adapting texts and styles in a Celtic context: interdisciplinary perspectives on processes of literary transfer in the middle ages: studies in honour of Erich Poppe, Studien und Texte zur Keltologie 13, Münster: Nodus Publikationen, 2016. 1–20.
Poppe, Erich, “Scholia: a medieval learned background to In cath catharda”, in: Oudaer, Guillaume, Gaël Hily, and Herve Le Bihan (eds), Mélanges en l’honneur de Pierre-Yves Lambert, Rennes: TIR, 2015. 431–439.
Erich Poppe, “Foreword”, in: Natalia Petrovskaia, Medieval Welsh perceptions of the Orient (2015).
Poppe, Erich, “Imtheachta Aeniasa and its place in medieval Irish textual history”, in: O'Connor, Ralph [ed.], Classical literature and learning in medieval Irish narrative, Studies in Celtic History 34, Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2014. 25–39.
Poppe, Erich, “Textual authority and adaptation in ‘Christ’s first preaching’ in the Leabhar Breac”, in: Boyle, Elizabeth, and Deborah Hayden (eds), Authorities and adaptations: the reworking and transmission of textual sources in medieval Ireland, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2014. 159–184.
Poppe, Erich, “Narrative history and cultural memory in medieval Ireland. Some preliminary thoughts”, in: Rekdal, Jan Erik, and Erich Poppe (eds), Medieval Irish perspectives on cultural memory, Studien und Texte zur Keltologie 11, Münster: Nodus Publikationen, 2014. 135–176.
Poppe, Erich, “Exotic and monstrous races in the Leabhar Breac’s Gospel History and the transmission of arcane knowledge to medieval Ireland”, in: Hambro, Cathinka, and Lars Ivar Widerøe (eds), Lochlann: Festskrift til Jan Erik Rekdal på 60-årsdagen / Aistí in ómós do Jan Erik Rekdal ar a 60ú lá breithe, Oslo: Hermes Academic, 2013. 39–56.
Poppe, Erich, and Dagmar Schlüter, “Greece, Ireland, Ulster, and Troy: of hybrid origins and heroes”, in: Hoofnagle, Wendy Marie, and Wolfram R. Keller (eds.), Other nations: the hybridization of insular mythology and identity, Britannica et Americana (3. Folge) 27, Heidelberg: Universitätsverlag Winter, 2011. 127–144.
Poppe, Erich, “Der erotische Blick auf Cú Chulainns Körper”, in: Hemprich, Gisbert [ed.], Festgabe für Hildegard L. C. Tristram: überreicht von Studenten, Kollegen und Freunden des ehemaligen Faches Keltologie der Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, Bonner Beiträge zur Keltologie 1, Berlin: Curach Bhán, 2009. 177–195.
Poppe, Erich, and Regine Reck, “Rewriting Bevis in Wales and Ireland”, in: Fellows, Jennifer, and Ivana Djordjević (eds), Sir Bevis of Hampton in literary tradition, Cambridge: D. S. Brewer, 2008. 37–50.
Erich Poppe, “Airec Menman Uraird maic Coise”, in: John T. Koch (ed.), Celtic culture: a historical encyclopedia (2006): 32–33.
Poppe, Erich, “The Latin quotations in Auraicept na n-éces: microtexts and their transmission”, in: Ní Chatháin, Próinséas, and Michael Richter (eds.), Ireland and Europe in the early Middle Ages: texts and transmissions / Irland und Europa im früheren Mittelalter: Texte und Überlieferung, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2002. 296–312.
Poppe, Erich, “The ‘expanded form’ in Insular Celtic and English: Some historical and comparative considerations, with special emphasis on Middle Irish”, in: Filppula, Markku, Juhani Klemola, and Heli Pitkänen (eds.), The Celtic roots of English, Studies in Languages 37, Joensuu: University of Joensuu, 2002. 237–270.
Poppe, Erich, “Codes of conduct and honour in Stair Bibuis”, in: Richter, Michael, and Jean-Michel Picard (eds.), Ogma: essays in Celtic studies in honour of Próinséas Ní Chatháin, Dublin: Four Courts, 2002. 200–210.
Poppe, Erich, “Latinate terminology in Auraicept na nÉces”, in: Cram, David, Andrew Linn, and Elke Nowak (eds.), History of linguistics 1996: selected papers from the Seventh International Conference on the History of the Language Sciences, Oxford, 12–17 September 1996, vol. 1: Traditions in linguistics worldwide., Amsterdam, Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1999. 191–201.
Poppe, Erich, “Nídat mera na doene ‘Die Menschen sind nicht töricht’?: Verkennung, Täuschung und Selbsttäuschung in mittelalterlichen irischen Erzählungen”, in: Tristram, Hildegard L. C. (ed.), Medieval insular literature between the oral and the written, II: continuity of transmission, ScriptOralia 97, Tübingen: Gunter Narr, 1997. 117–137.
Poppe, Erich, “Favourite expressions, repetition, and variation: observations on Beatha Mhuire Eigiptacdha in Add. 30512”, in: Poppe, Erich, and Bianca Ross (eds.), The legend of Mary of Egypt in medieval insular hagiography, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 1996. 279–299.
Poppe, Erich, “Beobachtungen zum Adverbialgebrauch in den Texten der Táin bó Cúailnge”, in: Tristram, Hildegard L. C. [ed.], Studien zur Táin bó Cúailnge, ScriptOralia 52, Tübingen: Gunter Narr Verlag, 1993. 29–59.
Fife, James, and Erich Poppe, “Introduction — Word order in Brythonic”, in: Fife, James, and Erich Poppe (eds.), Studies in Brythonic word order, Amsterdam Studies in the Theory and History of Linguistic Science 4.83, Amsterdam: Benjamins, 1991. vii–ix.
Poppe, Erich, “Word order in Cyfranc Lludd a Llefelys: notes on the pragmatics of constituent-ordering in MW narrative prose”, in: Fife, James, and Erich Poppe (eds.), Studies in Brythonic word order, Amsterdam Studies in the Theory and History of Linguistic Science 4.83, Amsterdam: Benjamins, 1991. 155–204.
Poppe, Erich, “Word-order patterns in Breudwyt Ronabwy”, in: Ball, Martin J., James Fife, Erich Poppe, and Jenny Rowland (eds.), Celtic linguistics / Ieithyddiaeth Geltaidd: readings in the Brythonic languages. Festschrift for T. Arwyn Watkins, Amsterdam Studies in the Theory and History of Linguistic Science 4.68, Current Issues in Linguistic Theory, Amsterdam: Benjamins, 1990. 445–460.

As honouree

Harlos, Axel, and Neele Harlos (eds), Adapting texts and styles in a Celtic context: interdisciplinary perspectives on processes of literary transfer in the middle ages: studies in honour of Erich Poppe, Studien und Texte zur Keltologie 13, Münster: Nodus Publikationen, 2016.
Includes a bibliography of Erich Poppe’s publications.
Bock, Franziska, Dagmar Bronner, and Dagmar Schlüter (eds), Allerlei Keltisches. Studien zu Ehren von Erich Poppe. Studies in honour of Erich Poppe, Berlin: curach bhán, 2011.

As honouree

Harlos, Axel, and Neele Harlos (eds), Adapting texts and styles in a Celtic context: interdisciplinary perspectives on processes of literary transfer in the middle ages: studies in honour of Erich Poppe, Studien und Texte zur Keltologie 13, Münster: Nodus Publikationen, 2016.
Bock, Franziska, Dagmar Bronner, and Dagmar Schlüter (eds), Allerlei Keltisches. Studien zu Ehren von Erich Poppe. Studies in honour of Erich Poppe, Berlin: curach bhán, 2011.