Bibliography

Huw
Pryce
s. xx / s. xxi

15 publications between 1986 and 2016 indexed
Sort by:

Works authored

Pryce, Huw, and Charles Insley (eds.), The acts of Welsh rulers 1120-1283, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2005.
Pryce, Huw, Native law and the church in medieval Wales, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1993.  
Contents: Introduction; Part I, Co-operation and conflict: 1 Lawbooks and lawyers; 2 The sacred dimension to legal processes; 3 Ecclesiastical criticism of Welsh law; 4 Marriage and inheritance; 5 Testamentary disposition; Part II, Privilege and power: Introduction; 6 The legal status of clerics; 7 Ecclesiastical sanctuary; 8 Land and lordship; 9 Church and state; Conclusion.
Contents: Introduction; Part I, Co-operation and conflict: 1 Lawbooks and lawyers; 2 The sacred dimension to legal processes; 3 Ecclesiastical criticism of Welsh law; 4 Marriage and inheritance; 5 Testamentary disposition; Part II, Privilege and power: Introduction; 6 The legal status of clerics; 7 Ecclesiastical sanctuary; 8 Land and lordship; 9 Church and state; Conclusion.

Works edited

Pryce, Huw [ed.], Literacy in medieval Celtic societies, Cambridge Studies in Medieval Literature 33, Cambridge, New York, Melbourne: Cambridge University Press, 1998.

Contributions to journals

Pryce, Huw, “Medieval Welsh history in the Victorian Age”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 71 (Summer, 2016): 1–28.
Pryce, Huw, and Gwilym Owen, “Medieval Welsh law and the mid-Victorian foreshore”, The Journal of Legal History 35:2 (2014): 172–199.  
abstract:
In 1862 a text of medieval Welsh law, attributed to the tenth-century king Hywel Dda (Hywel the Good), was cited as part of the defence in a case, Attorney General v Jones, concerning disputed foreshore rights in Anglesey, north Wales. This article aims to explain why and how Welsh law, effectively abolished by the Acts of Union of 1536–43, was deployed as evidence in the case and how far this marked a readiness to accommodate the distinctive legal heritage of Wales within the framework of the nineteenth-century common law. As well as analysing the legal arguments presented, the article seeks to assess the broader significance of the case by setting it in the contexts of the Crown's increasingly vigorous claims to foreshores, the circumstances and attitudes of the real defendant, William Bulkeley Hughes, and antiquarian study of the medieval Welsh law-texts, including their use in previous mid-Victorian foreshore disputes.
abstract:
In 1862 a text of medieval Welsh law, attributed to the tenth-century king Hywel Dda (Hywel the Good), was cited as part of the defence in a case, Attorney General v Jones, concerning disputed foreshore rights in Anglesey, north Wales. This article aims to explain why and how Welsh law, effectively abolished by the Acts of Union of 1536–43, was deployed as evidence in the case and how far this marked a readiness to accommodate the distinctive legal heritage of Wales within the framework of the nineteenth-century common law. As well as analysing the legal arguments presented, the article seeks to assess the broader significance of the case by setting it in the contexts of the Crown's increasingly vigorous claims to foreshores, the circumstances and attitudes of the real defendant, William Bulkeley Hughes, and antiquarian study of the medieval Welsh law-texts, including their use in previous mid-Victorian foreshore disputes.
Pryce, Huw, “The context and purpose of the earliest Welsh lawbooks”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 39 (Summer, 2000): 39–64.
Pryce, Huw, “The church of Trefeglwys and the end of the ‘Celtic’ charter tradition in twelfth-century Wales”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 25 (Summer, 1993): 15–54.
Pryce, Huw, “Early Irish canons and medieval Welsh law”, Peritia 5 (1986): 107–127.  
abstract:
This paper deals with the relationships between the legal traditions of Ireland and Wales in the middle ages and identifies two groups of borrowings from the early eighth-century Collectio canonum Hibernensis in the lawbooks of medieval Wales. The borrowings all come from Books xxx and xxxiv (in Wasserschleben’s edition) and deal with deposits and sureties; however, the compilers of the Welsh lawbooks, whose earliest extant redactions date from the late twelfth and thirteenth centuries, were plainly ignorant of the relevant passages’ ultimate Irish source. After close textual analysis of the passages in medieval Welsh law derived from the Hibernensis, the paper discusses how the Irish canons may have become known in Wales, and how they could have been transmitted into the surviving texts of Welsh law. Attention is drawn to the importance of the borrowings as a unique witness to the presence of the Hibernensis in medieval Wales, as well as to their significance for an understanding of the sources, ecclesiastical connections, and Irish affinities of medieval Welsh law.
(source: Brepols)
abstract:
This paper deals with the relationships between the legal traditions of Ireland and Wales in the middle ages and identifies two groups of borrowings from the early eighth-century Collectio canonum Hibernensis in the lawbooks of medieval Wales. The borrowings all come from Books xxx and xxxiv (in Wasserschleben’s edition) and deal with deposits and sureties; however, the compilers of the Welsh lawbooks, whose earliest extant redactions date from the late twelfth and thirteenth centuries, were plainly ignorant of the relevant passages’ ultimate Irish source. After close textual analysis of the passages in medieval Welsh law derived from the Hibernensis, the paper discusses how the Irish canons may have become known in Wales, and how they could have been transmitted into the surviving texts of Welsh law. Attention is drawn to the importance of the borrowings as a unique witness to the presence of the Hibernensis in medieval Wales, as well as to their significance for an understanding of the sources, ecclesiastical connections, and Irish affinities of medieval Welsh law.
(source: Brepols)

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Pryce, Huw, “Gerald of Wales, Gildas, and the Descriptio Kambriae ”, in: Edmonds, Fiona, and Paul Russell (eds.), Tome: studies in medieval Celtic history and law in honour of Thomas Charles-Edwards, Studies in Celtic History 31, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2011. 115–124.
Pryce, Huw, “Anglo-Welsh agreements, 1201–77”, in: Griffiths, Ralph A., and Phillipp R. Schofield (eds.), Wales and the Welsh in the Middle Ages: essays presented to J. Beverley Smith, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2011. 1–19.
Pryce, Huw, “The dynasty of Deheubarth and the church of St Davids”, in: Evans, J. Wyn, and Jonathan M. Wooding (eds.), St David of Wales: cult, church and nation, Studies in Celtic History 24, Woodbridge: Boydell Press, 2007. 305–316.
Pryce, Huw, “Culture, power and the charters of Welsh rulers”, in: Flanagan, Marie Therese, and Judith A. Green (eds.), Charters and charter scholarship in Britain and Ireland, Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2005. 184–202.
Pryce, Huw, “The medieval church”, in: Smith, J. Beverley, and Llinos Beverley Smith (eds), A history of Merioneth, vol. 2: Middle Ages, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2001. 254–296.
Pryce, Huw, “The household priest (offeiriad teulu)”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and Paul Russell (eds.), The Welsh king and his court, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000. 82–93.
Pryce, Huw, “Duw yn lle mach: briduw yng nghyfraith Hywel”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and D. B. Walters (eds.), Lawyers and laymen. Studies in the history of law, presented to Professor Dafydd Jenkins on his seventy-fifth birthday, Gwyl Ddewi 1986, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1986. 47–71.