Bibliography

Brendan
Smith

8 publications between 1996 and 2018 indexed
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Works authored

Dryburgh, Paul, and Brendan Smith, Inquisitions and extents of medieval Ireland, List and Index Society 320, Kew, London: List and Index Society, 2007.  
abstract:
This volume consists of calendars of Irish-related documents found in the series C 132-C 138 (Inquisitions Post Mortem, Henry III-Henry V), C 142 (Inquisitions Ad Quod Damnum, Henry III-Richard III) and C 145 (Miscellaneous Inquisitions, Henry III-Richard III) held by The National Archives. It also contains an extensive place and name index, and an index of jurors and subjects.
abstract:
This volume consists of calendars of Irish-related documents found in the series C 132-C 138 (Inquisitions Post Mortem, Henry III-Henry V), C 142 (Inquisitions Ad Quod Damnum, Henry III-Richard III) and C 145 (Miscellaneous Inquisitions, Henry III-Richard III) held by The National Archives. It also contains an extensive place and name index, and an index of jurors and subjects.
Dryburgh, Paul, and Brendan Smith, Handbook and select calendar of sources for medieval Ireland in the National Archives of the United Kingdom, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2004.  
abstract:
The establishment of English rule in Ireland in the late 12th century involved the introduction not only of foreign settlers, but also of administrative practices based on those of England. In the 13th century a chancery, an exchequer, and courts of law centred on Dublin developed which produced written records of their operations. The fact that the lord of Ireland was also the king of England, and that every English subject in Ireland had the right to appeal directly to the king, meant that Irish affairs were also well represented in the records produced by the English government at Westminster. These two sets of records were created and kept independently by both administrations, but a series of disasters stretching from the 13th century to the 20th means that almost all of the Irish archive has been lost. Fortunately, the National Archives of the United Kingdom, based at Kew in London, continues to hold a wealth of material relating to Ireland in the medieval centuries. This book provides a guide to records which reflect many facets of this period in Irish history, including relations between natives and settlers, the church, life on the manor, trade and commerce, land-holding, Anglo-Irish relations, and the operation of the law. It should serve as the starting-point for future research into many aspects of the medieval Irish past.
abstract:
The establishment of English rule in Ireland in the late 12th century involved the introduction not only of foreign settlers, but also of administrative practices based on those of England. In the 13th century a chancery, an exchequer, and courts of law centred on Dublin developed which produced written records of their operations. The fact that the lord of Ireland was also the king of England, and that every English subject in Ireland had the right to appeal directly to the king, meant that Irish affairs were also well represented in the records produced by the English government at Westminster. These two sets of records were created and kept independently by both administrations, but a series of disasters stretching from the 13th century to the 20th means that almost all of the Irish archive has been lost. Fortunately, the National Archives of the United Kingdom, based at Kew in London, continues to hold a wealth of material relating to Ireland in the medieval centuries. This book provides a guide to records which reflect many facets of this period in Irish history, including relations between natives and settlers, the church, life on the manor, trade and commerce, land-holding, Anglo-Irish relations, and the operation of the law. It should serve as the starting-point for future research into many aspects of the medieval Irish past.
Smith, Brendan, The register of Nicholas Fleming, archbishop Of Armagh, 1404–1416, Dublin: Irish Manuscripts Commission, 2003.
Smith, Brendan, The register of Milo Sweteman, archbishop of Armagh, c.1361-1380, Dublin: Irish Manuscripts Commission, 1996.

Works edited

Smith, Brendan [ed.], The Cambridge history of Ireland, vol. 1: 600-1550, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2018.
Smith, Brendan [ed.], Britain and Ireland 900–1300: Insular responses to medieval European change, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999.

Contributions to journals

Smith, Brendan, “Lionel of Clarence and the English of Meath”, Peritia 10 (1996): 297–302.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Smith, Brendan, “The murder of John Dowdall, sheriff of Louth, 1402”, in: Duffy, Seán [ed.], Princes, prelates and poets in medieval Ireland: essays in honour of Katharine Simms, Dublin: Four Courts Press, 2013. 185–195.