Bibliography

David
Stephenson
s. xx / s. xxi

20 publications between 1983 and 2019 indexed
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Works authored

Stephenson, David, Medieval Wales c.1050-1332: centuries of ambiguity, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2019.  
Chapters: 1. An outline survey of Welsh political history, c.1050–1332; 2. The Age of the Princes: shifting political cultures and structures; 3. The other Wales: the March; 4. The limits to princely power; 5. New ascendancies.
abstract:
After outlining conventional accounts of Wales in the High Middle Ages, this book moves to more radical approaches to its subject. Rather than discussing the emergence of the March of Wales from the usual perspective of the ‘intrusive’ marcher lords, for instance, it is considered from a Welsh standpoint explaining the lure of the March to Welsh princes and its contribution to the fall of the native principality of Wales. Analysis of the achievements of the princes of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries focuses on the paradoxical process by which increasingly sophisticated political structures and a changing political culture supported an autonomous native principality, but also facilitated eventual assimilation of much of Wales into an English ‘empire’. The Edwardian conquest is examined and it is argued that, alongside the resultant hardship and oppression suffered by many, the rising class of Welsh administrators and community leaders who were essential to the governance of Wales enjoyed an age of opportunity. This is a book that introduces the reader to the celebrated and the less well-known men and women who shaped medieval Wales.
Chapters: 1. An outline survey of Welsh political history, c.1050–1332; 2. The Age of the Princes: shifting political cultures and structures; 3. The other Wales: the March; 4. The limits to princely power; 5. New ascendancies.
abstract:
After outlining conventional accounts of Wales in the High Middle Ages, this book moves to more radical approaches to its subject. Rather than discussing the emergence of the March of Wales from the usual perspective of the ‘intrusive’ marcher lords, for instance, it is considered from a Welsh standpoint explaining the lure of the March to Welsh princes and its contribution to the fall of the native principality of Wales. Analysis of the achievements of the princes of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries focuses on the paradoxical process by which increasingly sophisticated political structures and a changing political culture supported an autonomous native principality, but also facilitated eventual assimilation of much of Wales into an English ‘empire’. The Edwardian conquest is examined and it is argued that, alongside the resultant hardship and oppression suffered by many, the rising class of Welsh administrators and community leaders who were essential to the governance of Wales enjoyed an age of opportunity. This is a book that introduces the reader to the celebrated and the less well-known men and women who shaped medieval Wales.
Stephenson, David, Medieval Powys: kingdom, principality and lordships, 1132–1293, Studies in Celtic History, Woodbridge: Boydell & Brewer, 2016.  
abstract:
Powys, extending over north-east and central Wales, was one of three great medieval Welsh polities, along with Gwynedd to the north and Deheubarth (south-west), occupying nearly a quarter of the country. However, it has been somewhat neglected by historians, who have tended to dismiss it as a satellite realm of England, and viewed its leaders as obstacles to the efforts of Gwynedd leaders to construct a principality of Wales. This book provides the first full, authoritative history of Powys in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. It argues in particular that the Powysian rulers were dogged and resourceful survivors in the face of pressure from Welsh rivals and the problems of internal fragmentation; and that, paradoxically, co-operation with the English and intermarriage with marcher families underlay a desire to regain lands to the east lost in earlier centuries.
(source: publisher)
abstract:
Powys, extending over north-east and central Wales, was one of three great medieval Welsh polities, along with Gwynedd to the north and Deheubarth (south-west), occupying nearly a quarter of the country. However, it has been somewhat neglected by historians, who have tended to dismiss it as a satellite realm of England, and viewed its leaders as obstacles to the efforts of Gwynedd leaders to construct a principality of Wales. This book provides the first full, authoritative history of Powys in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. It argues in particular that the Powysian rulers were dogged and resourceful survivors in the face of pressure from Welsh rivals and the problems of internal fragmentation; and that, paradoxically, co-operation with the English and intermarriage with marcher families underlay a desire to regain lands to the east lost in earlier centuries.
(source: publisher)
Stephenson, David, Political power in medieval Gwynedd: governance and the Welsh princes, Studies in Welsh History, rev. ed. (1984), Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2014.  
abstract:
First published in 1984 under the title The governance of Gwynedd, this book has been reprinted to meet continued interest on the Princes of Gwynedd in medieval Wales. Political power in medieval Gwynedd: governance and the Welsh princes investigates the governance exercised by the thirteenth-century Princes of Gwynedd, particularly Llywelyn the Great (fl. 1194–1240) and Llywelyn the Last (fl. 1243–82) as they strove to extend their political control over much of Wales. The analysis rests on the combination of different classes of evidence — literary texts, Welsh laws, thirteenth- and fourteenth-century record sources, and the results of archaeological work. After a descriptive survey of the work of the Princes' officials, the range of revenues available to the Princes is discussed, as are their attempts to increase their income. The recruitment of a privileged ministerial elite is examined and detailed prosopographical analysis reveals the Princes' attempts to overcome the segmentary nature of the political structure. Finally, attention is focused on the ways in which the rise of the Llywelyns and the increased pressures of governance imposed by their ambitions created tensions within Gwynedd and contributed to the final collapse of native rule in Wales. A new introductory section discusses recently published work.
(source: University of Wales Press)
abstract:
First published in 1984 under the title The governance of Gwynedd, this book has been reprinted to meet continued interest on the Princes of Gwynedd in medieval Wales. Political power in medieval Gwynedd: governance and the Welsh princes investigates the governance exercised by the thirteenth-century Princes of Gwynedd, particularly Llywelyn the Great (fl. 1194–1240) and Llywelyn the Last (fl. 1243–82) as they strove to extend their political control over much of Wales. The analysis rests on the combination of different classes of evidence — literary texts, Welsh laws, thirteenth- and fourteenth-century record sources, and the results of archaeological work. After a descriptive survey of the work of the Princes' officials, the range of revenues available to the Princes is discussed, as are their attempts to increase their income. The recruitment of a privileged ministerial elite is examined and detailed prosopographical analysis reveals the Princes' attempts to overcome the segmentary nature of the political structure. Finally, attention is focused on the ways in which the rise of the Llywelyns and the increased pressures of governance imposed by their ambitions created tensions within Gwynedd and contributed to the final collapse of native rule in Wales. A new introductory section discusses recently published work.
(source: University of Wales Press)
Stephenson, David, The Aberconwy chronicle, Kathleen Hughes Memorial Lectures2, Cambridge: ASNC, 2001.
Stephenson, David, The governance of Gwynedd, Studies in Welsh History 5, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 1984.


Contributions to journals

Stephenson, David, “Events at Nefyn, c. 1200: the plundering of King John’s Irish hounds and hawks”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 75 (2018): 39–43.
Stephenson, David, “Empires in Wales: from Gruffudd ap Llywelyn to Llywelyn ap Gruffudd”, Welsh History Review 28 (2016): 26–54.  
abstract:
Several Welsh rulers in the eleventh to thirteenth centuries exercised wide supremacies in Wales, but factors in their construction were often deeply ambivalent. Thus violent elimination of rivals and opponents was gradually replaced by trial and imprisonment, or the taking of hostages and sureties, allowing opponents to survive and become the focus of resistance. English support was often crucial, but English involvement might threaten as well as sustain Welsh ascendancies. The increasing need for expert personnel might lead to over-reliance on the ministerial, military and learned elites. The building of Welsh supremacies often provoked resistance from Welsh magnates and communities in areas subjected to new overlords, as demonstrated by case studies of opposition in eastern Wales to the supremacies exercised by the Lord Rhys and Llywelyn ap Gruffudd.
abstract:
Several Welsh rulers in the eleventh to thirteenth centuries exercised wide supremacies in Wales, but factors in their construction were often deeply ambivalent. Thus violent elimination of rivals and opponents was gradually replaced by trial and imprisonment, or the taking of hostages and sureties, allowing opponents to survive and become the focus of resistance. English support was often crucial, but English involvement might threaten as well as sustain Welsh ascendancies. The increasing need for expert personnel might lead to over-reliance on the ministerial, military and learned elites. The building of Welsh supremacies often provoked resistance from Welsh magnates and communities in areas subjected to new overlords, as demonstrated by case studies of opposition in eastern Wales to the supremacies exercised by the Lord Rhys and Llywelyn ap Gruffudd.
Stephenson, David, “In search of a Welsh chronicler: the Annales Cambriae B-text for 1204–30”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 72 (Winter, 2016): 73–85.
Stephenson, David, “Crisis and continuity in a fourteenth-century Welsh lordship: the struggle for Powys, 1312–32”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 66 (2013): 57–78.
Stephenson, David, “Gerald of Wales and Annales Cambriae”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 60 (Winter, 2010): 23–38.
Stephenson, David, “Mawl Hywel ap Goronwy: dating and context”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 57 (Summer, 2009): 41–49.
Stephenson, David, “Welsh chronicles’ accounts of the mid-twelfth century”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 56 (Winter, 2008): 45–57.
Andrews, Rhian M., and David Stephenson, “Draig Argoed: Iorwerth Goch ap Maredudd, c. 1110–71”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 52 (Winter, 2006): 65–91.
Stephenson, David, “Another (large) piece of the jigsaw: the acts of Welsh rulers”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 50 (Winter, 2005): 67–72.
Stephenson, David, “The supremacy in (southern) Powys of Owain Fychan ap Madog: a reconsideration”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 49 (Summer, 2005): 45–55.
Stephenson, David, “The politics of Powys Wenwynwyn in the thirteenth century”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 7 (Summer, 1984): 39–61.
Stephenson, David, “Nefydd Hardd and the killing of Idwal ab Owain Gwynedd”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 6 (Winter, 1983): 63–66.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Stephenson, David, “The rulers of Gwynedd and Powys”, in: Burton, Janet, and Karen Stöber (eds), Monastic Wales: new approaches, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2013. 89–102.
Stephenson, David, “The chronicler of Cwm-hir Abbey, 1257–63: the construction of a Welsh chronicle”, in: Griffiths, Ralph A., and Phillipp R. Schofield (eds.), Wales and the Welsh in the Middle Ages: essays presented to J. Beverley Smith, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2011. 29–45.
Stephenson, David, “The Laws of Court: past reality or present ideal?”, in: Charles-Edwards, T. M., Morfydd E. Owen, and Paul Russell (eds.), The Welsh king and his court, Cardiff: University of Wales Press, 2000. 400–414.