Bibliography

Gregory
Toner
s. xx / s. xxi

20 publications between 1988 and 2019 indexed
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Works authored

Toner, Gregory [ed. and tr.], Bruiden Da Choca, Irish Texts Society 61, London: Irish Texts Society, 2007.
Toner, Gregory [director], Maxim Fomin, Grigory Bondarenko, Thomas Torma, Caoimhín Ó Dónaill, and Hilary Lavelle, eDIL: electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, 1st digital ed., Online: Royal Irish Academy. URL: <http://www.dil.ie>. 
Electronic internet edition of the Dictionary of the Irish language.
Electronic internet edition of the Dictionary of the Irish language.

Websites

Toner, Gregory [director], Maxim Fomin, Grigory Bondarenko, Thomas Torma, Caoimhín Ó Dónaill, and Hilary Lavelle, eDIL: electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language, revised ed. (2007), Online: Royal Irish Academy. URL: <http://edil.qub.ac.uk>. 
Electronic internet edition of the Dictionary of the Irish language.
Electronic internet edition of the Dictionary of the Irish language.

Works edited

Borsje, Jacqueline, Ann Dooley, Séamus Mac Mathúna, and Gregory Toner (eds), Celtic cosmology: perspectives from Ireland and Scotland, Papers in Mediaeval Studies 26, Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 2014. viii + 316 pp.
Toner, Gregory, and Séamus Mac Mathúna (eds), Ulidia 3: proceedings of the Third International Conference on the Ulster Cycle of Tales, University of Ulster, Coleraine 22–25 June, 2009. In memoriam Patrick Leo Henry, Berlin: curach bhán, 2013.

Contributions to journals

Griffith, Aaron, David Stifter, and Gregory Toner, “Early Irish lexicography ‒ A research survey”, Kratylos 63:1 (2018): 1–28.
Toner, Gregory, “Macha and the invention of myth”, Ériu 60 (2010): 81–109.  
abstract:
This paper provides new literary analyses of two tales associated with Emain Macha, both of which feature a woman called Macha: Noínden Ulad, which purports to tell the origin of the debility that the Ulstermen suffered during the Táin, and the story of Macha Mongrúad, who overthrew her enemies and forced them to construct the fort of Emain Macha. The discussion considers issues of warriorhood, justice and gender, and seeks to disentangle the themes of sovereignty and war in relation to the women called Macha. Two of the four women bearing the name Macha are, in all probability, relatively late innovations, and the primary function of the remaining two figures lies in warfare.
abstract:
This paper provides new literary analyses of two tales associated with Emain Macha, both of which feature a woman called Macha: Noínden Ulad, which purports to tell the origin of the debility that the Ulstermen suffered during the Táin, and the story of Macha Mongrúad, who overthrew her enemies and forced them to construct the fort of Emain Macha. The discussion considers issues of warriorhood, justice and gender, and seeks to disentangle the themes of sovereignty and war in relation to the women called Macha. Two of the four women bearing the name Macha are, in all probability, relatively late innovations, and the primary function of the remaining two figures lies in warfare.
Toner, Gregory, “‘Messe ocus Pangur Bán’: structure and cosmology”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 57 (Summer, 2009): 1–22.
Toner, Gregory, “Authority, verse and the transmission of senchas”, Ériu 55 (2005): 59–84.
Toner, Gregory, “Reconstructing the earliest Irish tale lists”, Éigse 32 (2000): 88–120.
Toner, Gregory, “The Ulster Cycle: historiography or fiction?”, Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies 40 (Winter, 2000): 1–20.
Toner, Gregory, “The transmission of Tochmarc Emire”, Ériu 49 (1998): 71–88.
Toner, Gregory, “Cormac Conloinges — the hero of the Mound”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 8 (1991): 60–62.
Toner, Gregory, “An file in Bás Cearbhaill agus Farbhlaidhe”, Seanchas Ardmhacha 14:2 (1991): 109–115.
Toner, Gregory, “Emain Macha in the literature”, Emania: Bulletin of the Navan Research Group 4 (Spring, 1988): 32–35.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Toner, Gregory, “Myth and the creation of landscape in early medieval Ireland”, in: Egeler, Matthias (ed.), Landscape and myth in northwestern Europe, Borders, Boundaries, Landscapes 2, Turnhout: Brepols, 2019. 79–97.
Toner, Gregory, “History and salvation in Lebor na hUidre”, in: Ó hUiginn, Ruairí (ed.), Lebor na hUidre, Codices Hibernenses Eximii 1, Dublin: Royal Irish Academy, 2015. 131–153.
Toner, Gregory, “Landscape and cosmology in the Dindshenchas”, in: Borsje, Jacqueline, Ann Dooley, Séamus Mac Mathúna, and Gregory Toner (eds), Celtic cosmology: perspectives from Ireland and Scotland, Papers in Mediaeval Studies 26, Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 2014. viii + 316 pp. 268–283.
Toner, Gregory, “Scribe and text in Lebor na hUidre: H’s intentions and methodology”, in: Ó hUiginn, Ruairí, and Brian Ó Catháin (eds.), Ulidia 2: proceedings of the Second International Conference on the Ulster Cycle of Tales, Maynooth 24-27 July 2005, Maynooth: An Sagart, 2009. 106–120.
Toner, Gregory, “Identifying Ptolemy’s Irish places and tribes”, in: Parsons, David N., and Patrick Sims-Williams (eds), Ptolemy: towards a linguistic atlas of the earliest Celtic place-names of Europe, Aberystwyth: CMCS Publications, 2000. ix + 188 pp. 73–82.