Bibliography

Andrew
Welsh
s. xx / s. xxi

6 publications between 1988 and 2011 indexed
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Contributions to journals

Welsh, Andrew, “Branwen, Beowulf, and the tragic peaceweaver tale”, Viator 22 (1991): 1–14.  
abstract:
Although it has long been assumed that the Middle Welsh tale Branwen Uerch Lyr, the Second Branch of the Mabinogi, is primarily a pastiche of story-elements from the mythological and literary traditions of medieval Ireland, many of the narrative elements of Branwen belong to the large, migratory stock of international folktale motifs and are better seen in the broader context of the traditional tale. It has also been thought that the narrative structure of Branwen is essentially that of a "calumniated wife" tale, though in fact most of the defining elements of such tales are missing from the Welsh narrative. The basis of Branwen is instead another traditional story of the Middle Ages, the "peaceweaver" tale, the best examples of which appear not in Celtic narrative but in the stories of Hildeburh and Freawaru in the "digressions" of Beowulf. The Old English poem and the Middle Welsh tale both give us versions of a fundamental and widespread medieval story of the exogamous dynastic marriage which tries but fails to overcome social feud and political antagonism.
abstract:
Although it has long been assumed that the Middle Welsh tale Branwen Uerch Lyr, the Second Branch of the Mabinogi, is primarily a pastiche of story-elements from the mythological and literary traditions of medieval Ireland, many of the narrative elements of Branwen belong to the large, migratory stock of international folktale motifs and are better seen in the broader context of the traditional tale. It has also been thought that the narrative structure of Branwen is essentially that of a "calumniated wife" tale, though in fact most of the defining elements of such tales are missing from the Welsh narrative. The basis of Branwen is instead another traditional story of the Middle Ages, the "peaceweaver" tale, the best examples of which appear not in Celtic narrative but in the stories of Hildeburh and Freawaru in the "digressions" of Beowulf. The Old English poem and the Middle Welsh tale both give us versions of a fundamental and widespread medieval story of the exogamous dynastic marriage which tries but fails to overcome social feud and political antagonism.
Welsh, Andrew, “Traditional tales and the harmonizing of story in Pwyll Pendeuic Dyuet”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 17 (Summer, 1989): 15–41.
Welsh, Andrew, “The traditional narrative motifs of The four branches of the Mabinogi”, Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies 15 (Summer, 1988): 51–62.

Contributions to edited collections or authored works

Welsh, Andrew, “Myths, folktales, and meaning”, in: Eska, Joseph F. [ed.], Narrative in Celtic tradition: essays in honor of Edgar M. Slotkin, CSANA Yearbook 8–9, New York: Colgate University Press, 2011. 256–275.
Andrew Welsh, “Manawydan fab Llyr: Wales, England, and the ‘new man’”, in: C. W. Sullivan III (ed.), The Mabinogi: a book of essays (1996): 121–141.
Welsh, Andrew, “Manawydan fab Llyr: Wales, England and the ‘new man’”, in: Byrne, Cyril J., Margaret Harry, and Pádraig Ó Siadhail (eds.), Celtic languages and Celtic peoples: proceedings of the Second North American Congress of Celtic studies, held in Halifax, August 16-19, 1989, Halifax, Nova Scotia: D’Arcy McGee Chair of Irish Studies, Saint Mary’s University, 1992. 369–382.