Manuscripts
Manuscript:
Castlerea, Clonalis House, Book of O'Conor Don = Book of O’Conor Don (Leabhar Uí Chonchubhair Dhoinn)
  • s. xvii
Ryan, Salvador, “Penance and the Privateer: handling sin in the bardic religious verse of the Book of the O’Conor Don (1631)”, in: Ó hAnnracháin, Tadhg, and Robert Armstrong (eds), Christianities in the early modern Celtic world, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014. 124–134.
Ó Macháin, Pádraig, “An introduction to the Book of the O'Conor Don”, in: Ó Macháin, Pádraig [ed.], The Book of the O'Conor Don: essays on an Irish manuscript, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2010. 1–31.
Ó hUiginn, Ruairí, “Captain Somhairle and his books revisited”, in: Ó Macháin, Pádraig [ed.], The Book of the O'Conor Don: essays on an Irish manuscript, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2010. 88–102.
Ó Macháin, Pádraig [ed.], The Book of the O'Conor Don: essays on an Irish manuscript, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2010.
Simms, Katharine, “The selection of poems for inclusion in the Book of the O'Conor Don”, in: Ó Macháin, Pádraig [ed.], The Book of the O'Conor Don: essays on an Irish manuscript, Dublin: Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies, 2010. 32–60.
Ó Háinle, Cathal, “Múin aithrighe dhamh, a Dhé revised”, Ériu 54 (2004): 103–123.  
abstract:

This essay consists of a new edition of the poem 'Múin aithrighe dhamh, a Dhé', together with a translation, commentary and notes. Lambert McKenna's edition of the poem, which was published in Dánta do chum Aonghus Fionn Ó Dálaigh (1919), was based on a single eighteenth-century manuscript, in which the poem was attributed to 'Ó Dálaigh Fionn' and which provided an incomplete and corrupt text. Further manuscripts containing the poem have since come to light. They provide a better text and suggest that Tadhg Óg Ó hUiginn was the author. The commentary pays particular attention to the apologue of the blood-spotted hand contained in the poem. A version of this apologue is contained in the late medieval collection Gesta Romanorum and seems to have provided the inspiration for Shakespeare's characterization of Lady Macbeth in the sleep-walking scene in Macbeth.

Bergin, Osborn, “Unpublished Irish poems XVII: neglected merit”, Studies: An Irish Quarterly Review 11:41 (March, 1922): 80–82.
Hyde, Douglas, “The Book of the O'Conor Don”, Ériu 8 (1916): 77–99.

Results for Book (68)

Welsh manuscript collection of religious texts, mainly in the hand of Hywel Fychan. Other parts of the original manuscript are are in Peniarth MS 12 and Cardiff MS 3.242.

  • c.1400
  • Hywel Fychan ap Hywel Goch

Welsh paper manuscript miscellany (268 pp.) in the hand of John David Rhys containing Welsh poetry as well as a vocabulary, a bardic grammar of the Dafydd Ddu recension, the so-called statutes of Gruffudd ap Cynan, a translation of Genesis I, items of biblical and historical interest, etc.

  • c.1579
  • John David Rhys

The Book of Llandaff is one of the oldest manuscripts of Wales. While its core is a gospelbook containing a copy of St Matthew’s Gospel, it is best known for its many substantial additions in the form of the Lives of St Elgar and St Samson, and various documents (such as charters) relating to the see of Llandaff and to bishops Dyfrig, Teilo and Euddogwy.

  • s. xii1
  • s. xiv1
  • Anonymous [hand in Harl. 4353, Cot. Cleo. A xiv and Book of Taliesin]

A lost source named for Dub Dá Leithe, abbot of Armagh (fl. 1049-1064). It is referred to by the Annals of Ulster, s.a. 630, 963, 1004 and 1021, and the copy of Baile in Scáil in Rawlinson B 512, f. 101r.

  • s. ximed
  • Book of Flaithrige mac Murchaidh