Manuscripts
Manuscript:
Leabhar Dubh Molaga
No catalogue entry available
Levin, Feliks, “Representation of the tales of the Ulster Cycle in Foras feasa ar Éirinn: sources and features of the retellings”, Studia Hibernica 44 (2018): 1–33. 
abstract:
This article deals with the representation of tales of the Ulster Cycle in Foras Feasa ar Éirinn, written by Geoffrey Keating in the seventeenth century. Among the sources of retellings of these stories, the article focuses on that copied in Cambridge McClean MS 187, which may have been the Black Book of Molaga, the hypothetical primary source of the death tales reproduced in Foras Feasa ar Éirinn, of which editors and students of the Ulster Cycle have not been aware. On closer examination it becomes evident that the tales as represented in Keating’s work and McClean 187, as well as other tales included in the Foras, were reworkings of earlier variants of the tales. Keating did not merely copy his primary sources but rather revised them: he either rearranged the plot of the original story or modified it in accordance with his own authorial intentions.

Results for Le*b*r (36)
  • Leabhar Bhriain mheic Dhomhnaill (lost)

A manuscript now lost but cited by name in Keating’s Foras feasa Érinn (iii 32) and Dubhaltach Mac Fhir Bhisigh’s Leabhar mór na ngenealach.

Irish manuscript now lost but cited by Mícheál Ó Cléirigh as a source for his transcription of the text Cogad Gáedel re Gallaib, of which he made a secondary copy in Brussels MS 2569-72 (dated March 1628 from Multyfarnham, Co. Westmeath). The title suggests an association with the bardic poet Cú Chonnacht Ó Dálaigh (d. 1139).

  • Leabhar Dubh Molaga

A manuscript now lost but cited as a source in Irish genealogical material.

Manuscript used as an exemplar for texts in the Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, MS 23 P 12.

  • Leabhar le Eochaidh Ua hIfearnáin

A manuscript now lost but apparently credited as a source for three poems in Brussels, Bibliothèque Royale de Belgique, MS 5100-5104, p. 53, in which Suibne is said to have composed the verse: Tuiccther asin rand sin ⁊ as an dá dhán gurab é Suibhne dorinne iad gé gurab ar Moling chuires as sein-leabhar iad .i. leabhur Murchaid meic Briain, “It is understood from this poem (rann) and from the two poems (dán) that Suibne composed them, although the old book, i.e. the book of Murchad mac Briain, attributes them to Moling”). The manuscript is apparently named for Murchad mac Bríain, i.e. son of Brían Bóruma.

A manuscript now lost but cited as a source for a genealogical tract on the Dál Fiatach.

Irish and Latin variants of the title ‘the Book of Sligo’ are attested in a number of sources from the 15th and 17th centuries. Its identity cannot be established beyond doubt nor is it necessarily true that the references are all to the same manuscript. Pádraig Ó Riain (CGSH, p. lii) has shown that those at least that can be dated to the 17th century refer to the Book of Lecan (Co. Sligo): these are James Ussher’s quotation of a triad about ‘St Patrick’s three Wednesdays’ and a Latin note added (by Ussher?) to a copy of the Vita sancti Declani which credits the Liber Sligunt as the source for a copy of the genealogies of Irish saints. There are two 15th-century mentions by the Irish title Leabhar Sligigh: one by the scribe of Aided Díarmata meic Cerbaill (first recension) in Egerton 1782, who acknowledges the Leabhar Sligig as having been the exemplar of his text; and an honourable co-mention, with Saltair Caisil, in a poem on the king of Tír Conaill, beg. Dimghach do Chonall Clann Dálaigh. Aided Díarmata is not found in the Book of Lecan, at least in the form in which it survives today. Ó Riain allows for the possibility that ‘the Book of Sligo’ “is indeed a lost codex whose name was mistakenly applied in the seventeenth century, perhaps by Ussher, to the well-known Book of Lecan”.