Manuscripts
Manuscript:
Leiden, University Library, MS BPL 67
  • s. ix
Bauer, Bernhard [principal researcher], The online database of the Old Irish Priscian glosses, Online: Indogermanistik Wien. URL: <http://www.univie.ac.at/indogermanistik/priscian/>. 
abstract:
... a corpus dictionary of all the Old Irish glosses dealing with the Latin grammar of Priscian, which are found in codex 904 of the Stiftsbibliothek of St Gall (Sankt Gallen, Switzerland) and in four minor mss. of roughly the same period, i.e.
  • Karlsruhe Codex Augiensis (Reichenau) CXXXII
  • Paris BN ms lat. 10290
  • Milan Bibl. Ambr. Codex Ambrosianus A 138 sup.
  • Leiden Universiteitsbibliotheek, BPL 67
To accomplish this task, the project worker Dr. Bernhard Bauer entered all the Old Irish Priscian glosses into a Filemaker database, analysed them grammatically, commented on them and, naturally, also provided a full glossary for them. This database is an adapted version of the one developed by Dr. Aaron Griffith for the Milan Glosses Dictionary Project. The main corpus of glosses adduced as a basis for this work, the St Gall glosses, was not taken from the gloss edition in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus but from a recently established online database containing the full text of the St Gall glosses. This database was compiled by Pádraic Moran and is itself based on the published as well as the unpublished work by Rijcklof Hofman on the Priscian glosses. Dr. Moran has kindly granted full access to this database.
(source: website)
Gumbert, J. P., “The Irish Priscian in Leiden”, Quaerendo 27:4 (1997): 280–299. 
English-language version of an article originally published in Dutch.
Gumbert, J. P., “De Ierse Priscianus te Leiden”, in: Hofman, Rijcklof, Bernadette Smelik, and Karel Jongeling (eds.), Kelten van Spanje tot Ierland, Utrecht: Stichting Uitgeverij de Keltische Draak, 1996. 73–91.
Stokes, Whitley, and John Strachan (eds.), Thesaurus palaeohibernicus: a collection of Old-Irish glosses, scholia, prose, and verse, 3 vols, vol. 2: Non-Biblical glosses and scholia; Old-Irish prose; names of persons and places; inscriptions; verse; indexes, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1903. 
comments: Reprinted by DIAS in 1987, together with Stokes' supplementary volume.
Internet Archive: <link> Internet Archive – originally from Google Books: <link> Wikisource: <link>
231   “Glosses on Priscian (Leyden)”

Results for Le*b*r (36)
  • Leabhar Bhriain mheic Dhomhnaill (lost)

A manuscript now lost but cited by name in Keating’s Foras feasa Érinn (iii 32) and Dubhaltach Mac Fhir Bhisigh’s Leabhar mór na ngenealach.

Irish manuscript now lost but cited by Mícheál Ó Cléirigh as a source for his transcription of the text Cogad Gáedel re Gallaib, of which he made a secondary copy in Brussels MS 2569-72 (dated March 1628 from Multyfarnham, Co. Westmeath). The title suggests an association with the bardic poet Cú Chonnacht Ó Dálaigh (d. 1139).

  • Leabhar Dubh Molaga

A manuscript now lost but cited as a source in Irish genealogical material.

Manuscript used as an exemplar for texts in the Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, MS 23 P 12.

  • Leabhar le Eochaidh Ua hIfearnáin

A manuscript now lost but apparently credited as a source for three poems in Brussels, Bibliothèque Royale de Belgique, MS 5100-5104, p. 53, in which Suibne is said to have composed the verse: Tuiccther asin rand sin ⁊ as an dá dhán gurab é Suibhne dorinne iad gé gurab ar Moling chuires as sein-leabhar iad .i. leabhur Murchaid meic Briain, “It is understood from this poem (rann) and from the two poems (dán) that Suibne composed them, although the old book, i.e. the book of Murchad mac Briain, attributes them to Moling”). The manuscript is apparently named for Murchad mac Bríain, i.e. son of Brían Bóruma.

A manuscript now lost but cited as a source for a genealogical tract on the Dál Fiatach.

Irish and Latin variants of the title ‘the Book of Sligo’ are attested in a number of sources from the 15th and 17th centuries. Its identity cannot be established beyond doubt nor is it necessarily true that the references are all to the same manuscript. Pádraig Ó Riain (CGSH, p. lii) has shown that those at least that can be dated to the 17th century refer to the Book of Lecan (Co. Sligo): these are James Ussher’s quotation of a triad about ‘St Patrick’s three Wednesdays’ and a Latin note added (by Ussher?) to a copy of the Vita sancti Declani which credits the Liber Sligunt as the source for a copy of the genealogies of Irish saints. There are two 15th-century mentions by the Irish title Leabhar Sligigh: one by the scribe of Aided Díarmata meic Cerbaill (first recension) in Egerton 1782, who acknowledges the Leabhar Sligig as having been the exemplar of his text; and an honourable co-mention, with Saltair Caisil, in a poem on the king of Tír Conaill, beg. Dimghach do Chonall Clann Dálaigh. Aided Díarmata is not found in the Book of Lecan, at least in the form in which it survives today. Ó Riain allows for the possibility that ‘the Book of Sligo’ “is indeed a lost codex whose name was mistakenly applied in the seventeenth century, perhaps by Ussher, to the well-known Book of Lecan”.