Manuscripts
Results for Book (68)
Not yet published.
  • 1823
  • Seán Ó Cléirigh [d. 1846]
Not yet published.

A manuscript now lost but apparently credited as a source for three poems in Brussels, Bibliothèque Royale de Belgique, MS 5100-5104, p. 53, in which Suibne is said to have composed the verse: Tuiccther asin rand sin ⁊ as an dá dhán gurab é Suibhne dorinne iad gé gurab ar Moling chuires as sein-leabhar iad .i. leabhur Murchaid meic Briain, “It is understood from this poem (rann) and from the two poems (dán) that Suibne composed them, although the old book, i.e. the book of Murchad mac Briain, attributes them to Moling”). The manuscript is apparently named for Murchad mac Bríain, i.e. son of Brían Bóruma.

Irish and Latin variants of the title ‘the Book of Sligo’ are attested in a number of sources from the 15th and 17th centuries. Its identity cannot be established beyond doubt nor is it necessarily true that the references are all to the same manuscript. Pádraig Ó Riain (CGSH, p. lii) has shown that those at least that can be dated to the 17th century refer to the Book of Lecan (Co. Sligo): these are James Ussher’s quotation of a triad about ‘St Patrick’s three Wednesdays’ and a Latin note added (by Ussher?) to a copy of the Vita sancti Declani which credits the Liber Sligunt as the source for a copy of the genealogies of Irish saints. There are two 15th-century mentions by the Irish title Leabhar Sligigh: one by the scribe of Aided Díarmata meic Cerbaill (first recension) in Egerton 1782, who acknowledges the Leabhar Sligig as having been the exemplar of his text; and an honourable co-mention, with Saltair Caisil, in a poem on the king of Tír Conaill, beg. Dimghach do Chonall Clann Dálaigh. Aided Díarmata is not found in the Book of Lecan, at least in the form in which it survives today. Ó Riain allows for the possibility that ‘the Book of Sligo’ “is indeed a lost codex whose name was mistakenly applied in the seventeenth century, perhaps by Ussher, to the well-known Book of Lecan”.

Not yet published.

A manuscript now lost but used by Mícheál Ó Cléirigh as an exemplar for the Life of Mo Ling in Brussels, Bibliothèque Royale de Belgique, MS 4190-4200, f. 53v: I nAthcliath do scriobad as Leabhur Tighe Molling. Ocus léiccim Moling atá il-Laidin i muinigin na mbrathar Ccléirigh cidh im Cléirich-sa féin .15. juil. 1628 (‘In Dublin (this) has been copied out of the Book of Timulling. And I leave Moling's miracles, which are in Latin, in trust of the friars Clery, though I myself am a Clery, 15 July, 1628’ - ed. and tr. by Stokes).

Lost Irish manuscript whose prior existence is known from a reference in the Lebor na hUidre (RIA MS 23 E 25).

A lost Irish manuscript, which is mentioned In the colophon to Aided Nath Í ocus a adnacol in the Lebor na hUidre (Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, MS 23 E 25).

Four vellum leaves which originally formed part of the Book of Uí Maine (RIA D ii 1).

  • s. xiv

Vellum manuscript, originally part of the Book of Fermoy.

  • s. xv
Not yet published.

Contemporary copy of the Book of Howth (Lambeth Palace, MS 623) compiled by Christopher St Lawrence, seventh baron Howth (d. 1589).

  • s. xvi2
Not yet published.

Collection of notes, including poems, relating to the history of Ireland, compiled during the reign of Elizabeth I in the second half of the 16th century (c.1560x1579) by Christopher St Lawrence, seventh baron Howth (d. 1589).

  • s. xvi2
Not yet published.

Anglo-Saxon, probably Mercian prayer-book

  • s. viiiex / s. x1/4
  • s. xiv-xv
  • Anonymous [scribe I of Llyfr Coch Hergest], Hywel Fychan ap Hywel Goch, Anonymous [scribe of Llyfr Teg]